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This excerptThis excerpt from Raghunatha Varman's Laukika Nyayaratnakara says that it's from the Katha Brahmana of the Yajur Veda:

There is on the other hand a passage of the Katha Brahmana which goes to give high social rank even to a Chandala if he merely utters the word 'Siva. The passage is as follows:— “If a Chandala utters the word Siva, with him (a man of higher castes) should freely enter into conversation, should reside with him, and should eat with him.”

I can't verify this, since there aren't any online translations of the Katha Brahmana; Susan Rosenfield wrote a translation but it doesn't seem to even be in print. But you can read the Katha Brahmana in Sanskrit here. In any case, the Katha Brahmana is a text that only survives in fragments.

This excerpt from Raghunatha Varman's Laukika Nyayaratnakara says that it's from the Katha Brahmana of the Yajur Veda:

There is on the other hand a passage of the Katha Brahmana which goes to give high social rank even to a Chandala if he merely utters the word 'Siva. The passage is as follows:— “If a Chandala utters the word Siva, with him (a man of higher castes) should freely enter into conversation, should reside with him, and should eat with him.”

I can't verify this, since there aren't any online translations of the Katha Brahmana; Susan Rosenfield wrote a translation but it doesn't seem to even be in print. But you can read the Katha Brahmana in Sanskrit here. In any case, the Katha Brahmana is a text that only survives in fragments.

This excerpt from Raghunatha Varman's Laukika Nyayaratnakara says that it's from the Katha Brahmana of the Yajur Veda:

There is on the other hand a passage of the Katha Brahmana which goes to give high social rank even to a Chandala if he merely utters the word 'Siva. The passage is as follows:— “If a Chandala utters the word Siva, with him (a man of higher castes) should freely enter into conversation, should reside with him, and should eat with him.”

I can't verify this, since there aren't any online translations of the Katha Brahmana; Susan Rosenfield wrote a translation but it doesn't seem to even be in print. But you can read the Katha Brahmana in Sanskrit here. In any case, the Katha Brahmana is a text that only survives in fragments.

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source | link

This excerpt from Raghunatha Varman's Laukika Nyayaratnakara says that it's from the Katha Brahmana of the Yajur Veda:

There is on the other hand a passage of the Katha Brahmana which goes to give high social rank even to a Chandala if he merely utters the word 'Siva. The passage is as follows:— “If a Chandala utters the word Siva, with him (a man of higher castes) should freely enter into conversation, should reside with him, and should eat with him.”

I can't verify this, since there aren't any online translations of the Katha Brahmana; Susan Rosenfield wrote a translation but it doesn't seem to even be in print. But you can read the Katha Brahmana in Sanskrit here. In any case, the Katha Brahmana is a text that only survives in fragments.