2 added 1383 characters in body
source | link

Brahma Sutra 1.3.29 with the commentary of Sankara has a Rig Veda reference. It says(http://www.wisdomlib.org/hinduism/book/brahma-sutras/d/doc62753.html):

  1. From this very reason also (results) the eternity (of the Vedas).

Since the objects are eternal, that is, gods etc. as types are eternal, the Vedic words are eternal. This establishes the eternal nature of the Vedas. The Vedas were not written by anybody. They are impersonal and eternal. The Rishis only discovered them but were not authors of the Vedic texts.

“By means of their past good deeds (the priests) attained the capacity to understand the Vedas; (then) they found them dwelling in the Rishis” (Rig-Veda 10.71.3),

which shows that the Vedas are eternal.

In his Sri Bhasya, Ramanujaji in his commentary on verse 1.3.29 references Svetasvatara Upanishad 6.18. That verse says (Swami Gambhirananda translator):

He who created Brahma in the beginning and who, indeed, delivered the Vedas to him,--in that very Deity, who is the revealer of the knowledge regarding the Self, I, being very desirious of Liberation, seek refuge.

Ramanuja refers to the supreme authority of the Vedas in several places in his Sri Bhyasa. In his commentary to verse 2.2.35 he quotes several Upanishads to support his view. He says:

...The Upanishads declare clearly that the ultimate Reality, the supreme Person, can be known only through the Vedanta texts and not through any other means of knowledge. "I ask you of that supreme Person taught by the Upanishads' etc. (Brihadaranyaka Upanishad III.ix.26). Again, the Vedanta texts declare that this supreme Person is both the efficient and the material cause of the world, 'He desired, "Let me be many, let me be born"....He created all this that exists' etc. (Taittiriya Upanishad II.6); 'That Being willed, "May I become many, may I grow forth", It created fire' Etc. (Chandogya Upanishad VI.ii.3)...

A person who accepts the authority of the Vedas is astika - orthodox. A person who does not accept the authority of the Vedas is nastika - hetrodox - not a Vedantist, not a Hindu.

Brahma Sutra 1.3.29 with the commentary of Sankara has a Rig Veda reference. It says(http://www.wisdomlib.org/hinduism/book/brahma-sutras/d/doc62753.html):

  1. From this very reason also (results) the eternity (of the Vedas).

Since the objects are eternal, that is, gods etc. as types are eternal, the Vedic words are eternal. This establishes the eternal nature of the Vedas. The Vedas were not written by anybody. They are impersonal and eternal. The Rishis only discovered them but were not authors of the Vedic texts.

“By means of their past good deeds (the priests) attained the capacity to understand the Vedas; (then) they found them dwelling in the Rishis” (Rig-Veda 10.71.3),

which shows that the Vedas are eternal.

Brahma Sutra 1.3.29 with the commentary of Sankara has a Rig Veda reference. It says(http://www.wisdomlib.org/hinduism/book/brahma-sutras/d/doc62753.html):

  1. From this very reason also (results) the eternity (of the Vedas).

Since the objects are eternal, that is, gods etc. as types are eternal, the Vedic words are eternal. This establishes the eternal nature of the Vedas. The Vedas were not written by anybody. They are impersonal and eternal. The Rishis only discovered them but were not authors of the Vedic texts.

“By means of their past good deeds (the priests) attained the capacity to understand the Vedas; (then) they found them dwelling in the Rishis” (Rig-Veda 10.71.3),

which shows that the Vedas are eternal.

In his Sri Bhasya, Ramanujaji in his commentary on verse 1.3.29 references Svetasvatara Upanishad 6.18. That verse says (Swami Gambhirananda translator):

He who created Brahma in the beginning and who, indeed, delivered the Vedas to him,--in that very Deity, who is the revealer of the knowledge regarding the Self, I, being very desirious of Liberation, seek refuge.

Ramanuja refers to the supreme authority of the Vedas in several places in his Sri Bhyasa. In his commentary to verse 2.2.35 he quotes several Upanishads to support his view. He says:

...The Upanishads declare clearly that the ultimate Reality, the supreme Person, can be known only through the Vedanta texts and not through any other means of knowledge. "I ask you of that supreme Person taught by the Upanishads' etc. (Brihadaranyaka Upanishad III.ix.26). Again, the Vedanta texts declare that this supreme Person is both the efficient and the material cause of the world, 'He desired, "Let me be many, let me be born"....He created all this that exists' etc. (Taittiriya Upanishad II.6); 'That Being willed, "May I become many, may I grow forth", It created fire' Etc. (Chandogya Upanishad VI.ii.3)...

A person who accepts the authority of the Vedas is astika - orthodox. A person who does not accept the authority of the Vedas is nastika - hetrodox - not a Vedantist, not a Hindu.

1
source | link

Brahma Sutra 1.3.29 with the commentary of Sankara has a Rig Veda reference. It says(http://www.wisdomlib.org/hinduism/book/brahma-sutras/d/doc62753.html):

  1. From this very reason also (results) the eternity (of the Vedas).

Since the objects are eternal, that is, gods etc. as types are eternal, the Vedic words are eternal. This establishes the eternal nature of the Vedas. The Vedas were not written by anybody. They are impersonal and eternal. The Rishis only discovered them but were not authors of the Vedic texts.

“By means of their past good deeds (the priests) attained the capacity to understand the Vedas; (then) they found them dwelling in the Rishis” (Rig-Veda 10.71.3),

which shows that the Vedas are eternal.