2 added 145 characters in body
source | link

The narrow ideas about dharma given in the post Vedic Smritis have been given in the above answer by sv. It is not necessary to follow the Smritis on this issue. (In fact all unreasonable texts whether in Sruti, Smriti, Purana, dharmasastras or Itihasas should either be properly interpreted or discarded.) There is a better definition of dharma (understood as righteousness) given in Hindu scripture.

Bhishma said, ‘..it is difficult to say what righteousness is. It is not easy to indicate it. No one in discoursing upon righteousness, can indicate it accurately. Righteousness was declared (by Brahman) for the advancement and growth of all creatures. Therefore, that is righteousness which leads to advancement and growth in righteousness. Righteousness was declared for restraining creatures from injuring one another. Therefore, that is righteousness which prevents injury to creatures. Righteousness (Dharma) is so called because it upholds all creatures. In fact all creatures are upheld by righteousness. Therefore, that is righteousness which is capable of upholding all creatures. Some say that righteousness consists in what has been upheld in the Srutis. Others do not agree to this. I would not censure them that say so. Everything, again, has not been laid down in the Srutis.’

Mahabharata, Santi Parva, Section CIX

This broader definition of Dharma is not limited only to Hindus but to all of humanity by calling all to behave in such a manner that leads to the advancement and growth of all, that prevents injury to all, that upholds all.

The narrow ideas about dharma given in the post Vedic Smritis have been given in the above answer by sv. It is not necessary to follow the Smritis on this issue. There is a better definition of dharma (understood as righteousness) given in Hindu scripture.

Bhishma said, ‘..it is difficult to say what righteousness is. It is not easy to indicate it. No one in discoursing upon righteousness, can indicate it accurately. Righteousness was declared (by Brahman) for the advancement and growth of all creatures. Therefore, that is righteousness which leads to advancement and growth in righteousness. Righteousness was declared for restraining creatures from injuring one another. Therefore, that is righteousness which prevents injury to creatures. Righteousness (Dharma) is so called because it upholds all creatures. In fact all creatures are upheld by righteousness. Therefore, that is righteousness which is capable of upholding all creatures. Some say that righteousness consists in what has been upheld in the Srutis. Others do not agree to this. I would not censure them that say so. Everything, again, has not been laid down in the Srutis.’

Mahabharata, Santi Parva, Section CIX

This broader definition of Dharma is not limited only to Hindus but to all of humanity by calling all to behave in such a manner that leads to the advancement and growth of all, that prevents injury to all, that upholds all.

The narrow ideas about dharma given in the post Vedic Smritis have been given in the above answer by sv. It is not necessary to follow the Smritis on this issue. (In fact all unreasonable texts whether in Sruti, Smriti, Purana, dharmasastras or Itihasas should either be properly interpreted or discarded.) There is a better definition of dharma (understood as righteousness) given in Hindu scripture.

Bhishma said, ‘..it is difficult to say what righteousness is. It is not easy to indicate it. No one in discoursing upon righteousness, can indicate it accurately. Righteousness was declared (by Brahman) for the advancement and growth of all creatures. Therefore, that is righteousness which leads to advancement and growth in righteousness. Righteousness was declared for restraining creatures from injuring one another. Therefore, that is righteousness which prevents injury to creatures. Righteousness (Dharma) is so called because it upholds all creatures. In fact all creatures are upheld by righteousness. Therefore, that is righteousness which is capable of upholding all creatures. Some say that righteousness consists in what has been upheld in the Srutis. Others do not agree to this. I would not censure them that say so. Everything, again, has not been laid down in the Srutis.’

Mahabharata, Santi Parva, Section CIX

This broader definition of Dharma is not limited only to Hindus but to all of humanity by calling all to behave in such a manner that leads to the advancement and growth of all, that prevents injury to all, that upholds all.

1
source | link

The narrow ideas about dharma given in the post Vedic Smritis have been given in the above answer by sv. It is not necessary to follow the Smritis on this issue. There is a better definition of dharma (understood as righteousness) given in Hindu scripture.

Bhishma said, ‘..it is difficult to say what righteousness is. It is not easy to indicate it. No one in discoursing upon righteousness, can indicate it accurately. Righteousness was declared (by Brahman) for the advancement and growth of all creatures. Therefore, that is righteousness which leads to advancement and growth in righteousness. Righteousness was declared for restraining creatures from injuring one another. Therefore, that is righteousness which prevents injury to creatures. Righteousness (Dharma) is so called because it upholds all creatures. In fact all creatures are upheld by righteousness. Therefore, that is righteousness which is capable of upholding all creatures. Some say that righteousness consists in what has been upheld in the Srutis. Others do not agree to this. I would not censure them that say so. Everything, again, has not been laid down in the Srutis.’

Mahabharata, Santi Parva, Section CIX

This broader definition of Dharma is not limited only to Hindus but to all of humanity by calling all to behave in such a manner that leads to the advancement and growth of all, that prevents injury to all, that upholds all.