3 deleted 41 characters in body
source | link

The passage quoted certainly suggests that Suka was not in the highest stage of Nirvikalpa Samadhi when he uttered Bho since he would have been mute if he were in the highest stage. Later the passage says, 'Having cast off all the attributes of sound, etc., and showing his Yoga-prowess in the manner of his disappearance, Suka in this way attained to the highest station.' This last line of the passage implies that Suka became mute and attained the highest station. This is in agreement with what Sri Ramakrishna says in the passage posted below.

In Samadhi one attains the knowledge of Brahman - one realizes Brahman. In that state reasoning stops altogether, and man becomes mute. He has no power to describe the nature of Brahman.

Once a salt doll went to measure the depth of the ocean. It wanted to tell others how deep the water was. But this it could never do, for no sooner did it get into the water than it melted. Now who was there to report the ocean’s depth?

[The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, Chapter 3, Visit to Vidyasagar, August 5, 1882]

The passage is easily interpreted as an Advaita statement.

Can the passage be interpreted as supporting Vishishtadvaita or dvaita Vedanta?

It is not easy to do that since the passage says that Suka has become thetheir soul of the three worlds. The only way out seems to me is to read the phrase 'the soul of the world''their soul' metaphorically. The phrase should not be understood literally but actually means Suka became friend of the three worldall. Such an interpretation would agree with the Gita verse posted below.

He who by reason of the similarity of selves elsewhere, see the pleasure or pain as the same everywhere - that yogin, O Arjuna, is deemed to be the highest.

Gita 6.32

The passage quoted certainly suggests that Suka was not in the highest stage of Nirvikalpa Samadhi when he uttered Bho since he would have been mute if he were in the highest stage. Later the passage says, 'Having cast off all the attributes of sound, etc., and showing his Yoga-prowess in the manner of his disappearance, Suka in this way attained to the highest station.' This last line of the passage implies that Suka became mute and attained the highest station. This is in agreement with what Sri Ramakrishna says in the passage posted below.

In Samadhi one attains the knowledge of Brahman - one realizes Brahman. In that state reasoning stops altogether, and man becomes mute. He has no power to describe the nature of Brahman.

Once a salt doll went to measure the depth of the ocean. It wanted to tell others how deep the water was. But this it could never do, for no sooner did it get into the water than it melted. Now who was there to report the ocean’s depth?

[The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, Chapter 3, Visit to Vidyasagar, August 5, 1882]

The passage is easily interpreted as an Advaita statement.

Can the passage be interpreted as supporting Vishishtadvaita or dvaita Vedanta?

It is not easy to do that since the passage says that Suka has become the soul of the three worlds. The only way out seems to me is to read the phrase 'the soul of the world' metaphorically. The phrase should not be understood literally but actually means Suka became friend of the three world. Such an interpretation would agree with the Gita verse posted below.

He who by reason of the similarity of selves elsewhere, see the pleasure or pain as the same everywhere - that yogin, O Arjuna, is deemed to be the highest.

Gita 6.32

The passage quoted certainly suggests that Suka was not in the highest stage of Nirvikalpa Samadhi when he uttered Bho since he would have been mute if he were in the highest stage. Later the passage says, 'Having cast off all the attributes of sound, etc., and showing his Yoga-prowess in the manner of his disappearance, Suka in this way attained to the highest station.' This last line of the passage implies that Suka became mute and attained the highest station. This is in agreement with what Sri Ramakrishna says in the passage posted below.

In Samadhi one attains the knowledge of Brahman - one realizes Brahman. In that state reasoning stops altogether, and man becomes mute. He has no power to describe the nature of Brahman.

Once a salt doll went to measure the depth of the ocean. It wanted to tell others how deep the water was. But this it could never do, for no sooner did it get into the water than it melted. Now who was there to report the ocean’s depth?

[The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, Chapter 3, Visit to Vidyasagar, August 5, 1882]

The passage is easily interpreted as an Advaita statement.

Can the passage be interpreted as supporting Vishishtadvaita or dvaita Vedanta?

It is not easy to do that since the passage says that Suka has become their soul. The only way out seems to me is to read the phrase 'their soul' metaphorically. The phrase should not be understood literally but actually means Suka became friend of all. Such an interpretation would agree with the Gita verse posted below.

He who by reason of the similarity of selves elsewhere, see the pleasure or pain as the same everywhere - that yogin, O Arjuna, is deemed to be the highest.

Gita 6.32

2 added 240 characters in body
source | link

The passage quoted certainly suggests that Suka was not in the highest stage of Nirvikalpa Samadhi. He when he uttered Bho since he would have been mute if he were in the highest stage. Later the passage says, 'Having cast off all the attributes of sound, etc., and showing his Yoga-prowess in the manner of his disappearance, Suka in this way attained to the highest station.' This last line of the passage implies that Suka became mute and attained the highest station. This is in agreement with what Sri Ramakrishna says in the passage posted below.

In Samadhi one attains the knowledge of Brahman - one realizes Brahman. In that state reasoning stops altogether, and man becomes mute. He has no power to describe the nature of Brahman.

Once a salt doll went to measure the depth of the ocean. It wanted to tell others how deep the water was. But this it could never do, for no sooner did it get into the water than it melted. Now who was there to report the ocean’s depth?

[The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, Chapter 3, Visit to Vidyasagar, August 5, 1882][The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, Chapter 3, Visit to Vidyasagar, August 5, 1882]

However, does it mean thatThe passage is easily interpreted as an Advaita statement.

Can the passage can be interpreted as supporting Vishishtadvaita or dvaita Vedanta? I think

It is not easy to do that since the passage says that Suka has become the soul of the three worlds.

So how canThe only way out seems to me is to read the passage be interpreted? A possible explanation can be given fromphrase 'the soul of the implicationworld' metaphorically. The phrase should not be understood literally but actually means Suka became friend of the passage giventhree world. Such an interpretation would agree with the Gita verse posted below.

As long asHe who by reason of the slightest tracesimilarity of ego remainsselves elsewhere, one lives withinsee the jurisdiction ofpleasure or pain as the Adyasakti. Onesame everywhere - that yogin, O Arjuna, is under Her sway. One cannot go beyond Herdeemed to be the highest.

The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, Chapter 23, Festival at Surendra's House, June 20, 1884

Suka was not in the highest stage of Nirvikalpa Samadhi when he spoke. He was in a lower stage of Samadhi where he still retained some ego. So the passage is consistent with Advaita Vedanta if we accept that Suka was not at that time in the highest stage. Actually it is impossible to teach without any ego. Gita 6.32

The passage quoted certainly suggests that Suka was not in the highest stage of Nirvikalpa Samadhi. He would have been mute if he were in the highest stage.

In Samadhi one attains the knowledge of Brahman - one realizes Brahman. In that state reasoning stops altogether, and man becomes mute. He has no power to describe the nature of Brahman.

Once a salt doll went to measure the depth of the ocean. It wanted to tell others how deep the water was. But this it could never do, for no sooner did it get into the water than it melted. Now who was there to report the ocean’s depth?

[The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, Chapter 3, Visit to Vidyasagar, August 5, 1882]

However, does it mean that the passage can be interpreted as supporting Vishishtadvaita Vedanta? I think not since Suka has become the soul of the three worlds.

So how can the passage be interpreted? A possible explanation can be given from the implication of the passage given below.

As long as the slightest trace of ego remains, one lives within the jurisdiction of the Adyasakti. One is under Her sway. One cannot go beyond Her.

The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, Chapter 23, Festival at Surendra's House, June 20, 1884

Suka was not in the highest stage of Nirvikalpa Samadhi when he spoke. He was in a lower stage of Samadhi where he still retained some ego. So the passage is consistent with Advaita Vedanta if we accept that Suka was not at that time in the highest stage. Actually it is impossible to teach without any ego.

The passage quoted certainly suggests that Suka was not in the highest stage of Nirvikalpa Samadhi when he uttered Bho since he would have been mute if he were in the highest stage. Later the passage says, 'Having cast off all the attributes of sound, etc., and showing his Yoga-prowess in the manner of his disappearance, Suka in this way attained to the highest station.' This last line of the passage implies that Suka became mute and attained the highest station. This is in agreement with what Sri Ramakrishna says in the passage posted below.

In Samadhi one attains the knowledge of Brahman - one realizes Brahman. In that state reasoning stops altogether, and man becomes mute. He has no power to describe the nature of Brahman.

Once a salt doll went to measure the depth of the ocean. It wanted to tell others how deep the water was. But this it could never do, for no sooner did it get into the water than it melted. Now who was there to report the ocean’s depth?

[The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, Chapter 3, Visit to Vidyasagar, August 5, 1882]

The passage is easily interpreted as an Advaita statement.

Can the passage be interpreted as supporting Vishishtadvaita or dvaita Vedanta?

It is not easy to do that since the passage says that Suka has become the soul of the three worlds. The only way out seems to me is to read the phrase 'the soul of the world' metaphorically. The phrase should not be understood literally but actually means Suka became friend of the three world. Such an interpretation would agree with the Gita verse posted below.

He who by reason of the similarity of selves elsewhere, see the pleasure or pain as the same everywhere - that yogin, O Arjuna, is deemed to be the highest.

Gita 6.32

1
source | link

The passage quoted certainly suggests that Suka was not in the highest stage of Nirvikalpa Samadhi. He would have been mute if he were in the highest stage.

In Samadhi one attains the knowledge of Brahman - one realizes Brahman. In that state reasoning stops altogether, and man becomes mute. He has no power to describe the nature of Brahman.

Once a salt doll went to measure the depth of the ocean. It wanted to tell others how deep the water was. But this it could never do, for no sooner did it get into the water than it melted. Now who was there to report the ocean’s depth?

[The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, Chapter 3, Visit to Vidyasagar, August 5, 1882]

However, does it mean that the passage can be interpreted as supporting Vishishtadvaita Vedanta? I think not since Suka has become the soul of the three worlds.

So how can the passage be interpreted? A possible explanation can be given from the implication of the passage given below.

As long as the slightest trace of ego remains, one lives within the jurisdiction of the Adyasakti. One is under Her sway. One cannot go beyond Her.

The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, Chapter 23, Festival at Surendra's House, June 20, 1884

Suka was not in the highest stage of Nirvikalpa Samadhi when he spoke. He was in a lower stage of Samadhi where he still retained some ego. So the passage is consistent with Advaita Vedanta if we accept that Suka was not at that time in the highest stage. Actually it is impossible to teach without any ego.