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The Alwars (also spelled Azhwars) are a group of 12 ancient Vaishnava saints who lived in Tamil Nadu and are famous for their poetry in praise of Vishnu. The 4000 verses of the Alwars were compiled by the Vaishnava Acharya Nathamuni into a book called the Naalayira Divya Prabhandam, which is considered by many to be the "Dravida Veda", or the South Indian Veda. The Alwars are crucially important figures in the history of Vaishnavism; it's the principles and beliefs embodied in the Alwars' poems which Nathamuni used to found what we now call the Sri Vaishnava sect of Hinduism (of which I'm a member).

The Alwars (also spelled Azhwars) are a group of 12 ancient Vaishnava saints who lived in Tamil Nadu and are famous for their poetry in praise of Vishnu. The 4000 verses of the Alwars were compiled by the Vaishnava Acharya Nathamuni into a book called the Naalayira Divya Prabhandam, which is considered by many to be the "Dravida Veda", or the South Indian Veda. The Alwars are crucially important figures in the history of Vaishnavism; it's the principles and beliefs embodied in the Alwars' poems which Nathamuni used to found what we now call the Sri Vaishnava sect of Hinduism (of which I'm a member).

The Alwars (also spelled Azhwars) are a group of 12 ancient Vaishnava saints who lived in Tamil Nadu and are famous for their poetry in praise of Vishnu. The 4000 verses of the Alwars were compiled by the Vaishnava Acharya Nathamuni into a book called the Naalayira Divya Prabhandam, which is considered by many to be the "Dravida Veda", or South Indian Veda. The Alwars are crucially important figures in the history of Vaishnavism; it's the principles and beliefs embodied in the Alwars' poems which Nathamuni used to found what we now call the Sri Vaishnava sect of Hinduism (of which I'm a member).

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The Alwars (also spelled Azhwars) are a group of 12 ancient Vaishnava saints who lived in Tamil Nadu and are famous for their poetry in praise of Vishnu. The 4000 verses of the Alwars were compiled by the Vaishnava Acharya Nathamuni into a book called the Naalayira Divya Prabhandam, which is considered by many to be the "Dravida Veda", or the South Indian Veda. The Alwars are crucially important figures in the history of Vaishnavism; it's the principles and beliefs embodied in the Alwars' poems thatwhich Nathamuni used to found what we now call the Sri Vaishnava sect of Hinduism (of which I'm a member).

The Alwars (also spelled Azhwars) are a group of 12 ancient Vaishnava saints who lived in Tamil Nadu and are famous for their poetry in praise of Vishnu. The 4000 verses of the Alwars were compiled by the Vaishnava Acharya Nathamuni into a book called the Naalayira Divya Prabhandam, which is considered by many to be the "Dravida Veda", or the South Indian Veda. The Alwars are crucially important figures in the history of Vaishnavism; it's the principles and beliefs embodied in the Alwars' poems that Nathamuni used to found what we now call the Sri Vaishnava sect of Hinduism (of which I'm a member).

The Alwars (also spelled Azhwars) are a group of 12 ancient Vaishnava saints who lived in Tamil Nadu and are famous for their poetry in praise of Vishnu. The 4000 verses of the Alwars were compiled by the Vaishnava Acharya Nathamuni into a book called the Naalayira Divya Prabhandam, which is considered by many to be the "Dravida Veda", or the South Indian Veda. The Alwars are crucially important figures in the history of Vaishnavism; it's the principles and beliefs embodied in the Alwars' poems which Nathamuni used to found what we now call the Sri Vaishnava sect of Hinduism (of which I'm a member).

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But my question is, are there any secular accounts of how Nathamuni compiled the poems of the Alwars? Western Indologists, for instance, presumably don't believe that Nathamuni acquired them by magic, so what do they think he did? Sri Vaishnavas consider Nammalwar to be the guru of Nathamuni, since Nammalwar appeared before him and taught him so much. Do Western Indologists believe that Nathamuni was a contemporary of Nammalwar, and that Nammalwar was Nathamuni's literal guru? Do they think he learned all 4000 verses of the Alwars from Nammalwar, or do they think that he got the poems from many different people, akin to how Vyasa compiled the Vedas from many different sages?

But my question is, are there any secular accounts of how Nathamuni compiled the poems of the Alwars? Western Indologists, for instance, presumably don't believe that Nathamuni acquired them by magic, so what do they think he did? Sri Vaishnavas consider Nammalwar to be the guru of Nathamuni, since Nammalwar appeared before him and taught him so much. Do Western Indologists believe that Nathamuni was a contemporary of Nammalwar, and that Nammalwar was Nathamuni's literal guru? Do they think he learned all 4000 verses of the Alwars from Nammalwar, or do they think that he got the poems from many different people, akin to how Vyasa compiled the Vedas?

But my question is, are there any secular accounts of how Nathamuni compiled the poems of the Alwars? Western Indologists, for instance, presumably don't believe that Nathamuni acquired them by magic, so what do they think he did? Sri Vaishnavas consider Nammalwar to be the guru of Nathamuni, since Nammalwar appeared before him and taught him so much. Do Western Indologists believe that Nathamuni was a contemporary of Nammalwar, and that Nammalwar was Nathamuni's literal guru? Do they think he learned all 4000 verses of the Alwars from Nammalwar, or do they think that he got the poems from many different people, akin to how Vyasa compiled the Vedas from many different sages?

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