3 added 54 characters in body
source | link

Yes, judging wrongly is a sin or a crime.

In Hinduism, the responsibility of passing judgement (punishing wrong-doers) rests on the king.

For invisible crimes/sins the responsibility, however, rests on Yama the God of Karma and death.

A king maintains a council (parishad) comprised of Brahmins who are well versed in Srutis and the Smritis, to be able to prescribe the most appropriate punishments for a crime.

There are two cases here:

Case 1:

WhenThis is the case where a person who is actually guilty of committing a crime but does not get punished appropriately by the king and his council.

In this case, the king, the criminal, the judges and the witnesses each share 1/4th of the guilt.

Manu smriti 8.18. One quarter of (the guilt of) an unjust (decision) falls on him who committed (the crime), one quarter on the (false) witness, one quarter on all the judges, one quarter on the king.

Case 2:

Here some innocent person gets wrongly punished without commitingcommitting any crime.

In this case the king is held totally responsible.

Manu Smriti 9.249. When a king punishes an innocent (man), his guilt is considered as great as when he sets free a guilty man; but (he acquires) merit when he punishes (justly

Yes, judging wrongly is a sin or a crime.

In Hinduism, the responsibility of passing judgement (punishing wrong-doers) rests on the king.

For invisible crimes/sins the responsibility, however, rests on Yama the God of Karma and death.

A king maintains a council (parishad) comprised of Brahmins who are well versed in Srutis and the Smritis, to be able to prescribe the most appropriate punishments for a crime.

There are two cases here:

Case 1:

When a person who is actually guilty of a crime but does not get punished appropriately.

In this case, the king, the criminal, the judges and the witnesses each share 1/4th of the guilt.

Manu smriti 8.18. One quarter of (the guilt of) an unjust (decision) falls on him who committed (the crime), one quarter on the (false) witness, one quarter on all the judges, one quarter on the king.

Case 2:

Here some innocent person gets wrongly punished without commiting any crime.

In this case the king is held totally responsible.

Manu Smriti 9.249. When a king punishes an innocent (man), his guilt is considered as great as when he sets free a guilty man; but (he acquires) merit when he punishes (justly

Yes, judging wrongly is a sin or a crime.

In Hinduism, the responsibility of passing judgement (punishing wrong-doers) rests on the king.

For invisible crimes/sins the responsibility, however, rests on Yama the God of Karma and death.

A king maintains a council (parishad) comprised of Brahmins who are well versed in Srutis and the Smritis, to be able to prescribe the most appropriate punishments for a crime.

There are two cases here:

Case 1:

This is the case where a person is actually guilty of committing a crime but does not get punished appropriately by the king and his council.

In this case, the king, the criminal, the judges and the witnesses each share 1/4th of the guilt.

Manu smriti 8.18. One quarter of (the guilt of) an unjust (decision) falls on him who committed (the crime), one quarter on the (false) witness, one quarter on all the judges, one quarter on the king.

Case 2:

Here some innocent person gets wrongly punished without committing any crime.

In this case the king is held totally responsible.

Manu Smriti 9.249. When a king punishes an innocent (man), his guilt is considered as great as when he sets free a guilty man; but (he acquires) merit when he punishes (justly

2 added 12 characters in body
source | link

Yes, judging wrongly is a sin or a crime.

In Hinduism, the responsibility of passing judgement (punishing wrong-doers) rests on the king.

For invisible crimes/sins the responsibility, however, rests on Yama the God of Karma and death.

A king maintains a council (parishad) comprised of Brahmins who are well versed in Srutis and the Smritis, to be able to prescribe the most appropriate punishments for a crime.

There are two cases here:

Case 1:

When a person who is actually guilty of a crime but does not get punished appropriately.

In this case, the king, the criminal, the judges and the witnesses each share 1/4th of the guilt.

Manu smriti 8.18. One quarter of (the guilt of) an unjust (decision) falls on him who committed (the crime), one quarter on the (false) witness, one quarter on all the judges, one quarter on the king.

Case 2:

Here someonesome innocent person gets wrongly punished without commiting any crime.

In this case the king is held totally responsible.

Manu Smriti 9.249. When a king punishes an innocent (man), his guilt is considered as great as when he sets free a guilty man; but (he acquires) merit when he punishes (justly

In Hinduism, the responsibility of passing judgement (punishing wrong-doers) rests on the king.

For invisible crimes/sins the responsibility, however, rests on Yama the God of Karma and death.

A king maintains a council (parishad) comprised of Brahmins who are well versed in Srutis and the Smritis, to be able to prescribe the most appropriate punishments for a crime.

There are two cases here:

Case 1:

When a person who is actually guilty of a crime but does not get punished appropriately.

In this case, the king, the criminal, the judges and the witnesses each share 1/4th of the guilt.

Manu smriti 8.18. One quarter of (the guilt of) an unjust (decision) falls on him who committed (the crime), one quarter on the (false) witness, one quarter on all the judges, one quarter on the king.

Case 2:

Here someone innocent gets wrongly punished.

In this case the king is held totally responsible.

9.249. When a king punishes an innocent (man), his guilt is considered as great as when he sets free a guilty man; but (he acquires) merit when he punishes (justly

Yes, judging wrongly is a sin or a crime.

In Hinduism, the responsibility of passing judgement (punishing wrong-doers) rests on the king.

For invisible crimes/sins the responsibility, however, rests on Yama the God of Karma and death.

A king maintains a council (parishad) comprised of Brahmins who are well versed in Srutis and the Smritis, to be able to prescribe the most appropriate punishments for a crime.

There are two cases here:

Case 1:

When a person who is actually guilty of a crime but does not get punished appropriately.

In this case, the king, the criminal, the judges and the witnesses each share 1/4th of the guilt.

Manu smriti 8.18. One quarter of (the guilt of) an unjust (decision) falls on him who committed (the crime), one quarter on the (false) witness, one quarter on all the judges, one quarter on the king.

Case 2:

Here some innocent person gets wrongly punished without commiting any crime.

In this case the king is held totally responsible.

Manu Smriti 9.249. When a king punishes an innocent (man), his guilt is considered as great as when he sets free a guilty man; but (he acquires) merit when he punishes (justly

1
source | link

In Hinduism, the responsibility of passing judgement (punishing wrong-doers) rests on the king.

For invisible crimes/sins the responsibility, however, rests on Yama the God of Karma and death.

A king maintains a council (parishad) comprised of Brahmins who are well versed in Srutis and the Smritis, to be able to prescribe the most appropriate punishments for a crime.

There are two cases here:

Case 1:

When a person who is actually guilty of a crime but does not get punished appropriately.

In this case, the king, the criminal, the judges and the witnesses each share 1/4th of the guilt.

Manu smriti 8.18. One quarter of (the guilt of) an unjust (decision) falls on him who committed (the crime), one quarter on the (false) witness, one quarter on all the judges, one quarter on the king.

Case 2:

Here someone innocent gets wrongly punished.

In this case the king is held totally responsible.

9.249. When a king punishes an innocent (man), his guilt is considered as great as when he sets free a guilty man; but (he acquires) merit when he punishes (justly