3 added 1 character in body
source | link

According to Patanjali, the stages of yoga are yama Niyama Asana Pranayaama Pratyahaara Dhaaranaa Dhyana and Samadhi. Pratyahara means withdrawal of the mind from external objects. The next stage is dharana, and then Dhyana. Patanjali's concept of dhyana has been explained by Swami Vivekananda as follows:

In order to reach the superconscious state in a scientific manner it is necessary to pass through the various steps of Raja-Yoga I have been teaching. After Pratyâhâra and Dhâranâ, we come to Dhyâna, meditation. When the mind has been trained to remain fixed on a certain internal or external location, there comes to it the power of flowing in an unbroken current, as it were, towards that point. This state is called Dhyana. When one has so intensified the power of Dhyana as to be able to reject the external part of perception and remain meditating only on the internal part, the meaning, that state is called Samadhi. The three — Dharana, Dhyana, and Samadhi — together, are called Samyama. That is, if the mind can first concentrate upon an object, and then is able to continue in that concentration for a length of time, and then, by continued concentration, to dwell only on the internal part of the perception of which the object was the effect, everything comes under the control of such a mind.

Following Patanjali, He explains the concept of dhyana further as

. An unbroken flow of knowledge in that object is Dhyâna.

The mind tries to think of one object, to hold itself to one particular spot, as the top of the head, the heart, etc., and if the mind succeeds in receiving the sensations only through that part of the body, and through no other part, that would be Dharana, and when the mind succeeds in keeping itself in that state for some time, it is called Dhyana (mediation).

The mind tries to think of one object, to hold itself to one particular spot, as the top of the head, the heart, etc., and if the mind succeeds in receiving the sensations only through that part of the body, and through no other part, that would be Dharana, and when the mind succeeds in keeping itself in that state for some time, it is called Dhyana (mediation).

So in realdeep meditation there should be no awareness of the external world as the mind is immersed in its own object of thought. Swamiji's biography has many such examples since His childhood.

According to Patanjali, the stages of yoga are yama Niyama Asana Pranayaama Pratyahaara Dhaaranaa Dhyana and Samadhi. Pratyahara means withdrawal of the mind from external objects. The next stage is dharana, and then Dhyana. Patanjali's concept of dhyana has been explained by Swami Vivekananda as follows:

In order to reach the superconscious state in a scientific manner it is necessary to pass through the various steps of Raja-Yoga I have been teaching. After Pratyâhâra and Dhâranâ, we come to Dhyâna, meditation. When the mind has been trained to remain fixed on a certain internal or external location, there comes to it the power of flowing in an unbroken current, as it were, towards that point. This state is called Dhyana. When one has so intensified the power of Dhyana as to be able to reject the external part of perception and remain meditating only on the internal part, the meaning, that state is called Samadhi. The three — Dharana, Dhyana, and Samadhi — together, are called Samyama. That is, if the mind can first concentrate upon an object, and then is able to continue in that concentration for a length of time, and then, by continued concentration, to dwell only on the internal part of the perception of which the object was the effect, everything comes under the control of such a mind.

Following Patanjali, He explains the concept of dhyana further as

. An unbroken flow of knowledge in that object is Dhyâna.

The mind tries to think of one object, to hold itself to one particular spot, as the top of the head, the heart, etc., and if the mind succeeds in receiving the sensations only through that part of the body, and through no other part, that would be Dharana, and when the mind succeeds in keeping itself in that state for some time, it is called Dhyana (mediation).

So in real meditation there should be no awareness of the external world as the mind is immersed in its own object of thought. Swamiji's biography has many such examples since His childhood.

According to Patanjali, the stages of yoga are yama Niyama Asana Pranayaama Pratyahaara Dhaaranaa Dhyana and Samadhi. Pratyahara means withdrawal of the mind from external objects. The next stage is dharana, and then Dhyana. Patanjali's concept of dhyana has been explained by Swami Vivekananda as follows:

In order to reach the superconscious state in a scientific manner it is necessary to pass through the various steps of Raja-Yoga I have been teaching. After Pratyâhâra and Dhâranâ, we come to Dhyâna, meditation. When the mind has been trained to remain fixed on a certain internal or external location, there comes to it the power of flowing in an unbroken current, as it were, towards that point. This state is called Dhyana. When one has so intensified the power of Dhyana as to be able to reject the external part of perception and remain meditating only on the internal part, the meaning, that state is called Samadhi. The three — Dharana, Dhyana, and Samadhi — together, are called Samyama. That is, if the mind can first concentrate upon an object, and then is able to continue in that concentration for a length of time, and then, by continued concentration, to dwell only on the internal part of the perception of which the object was the effect, everything comes under the control of such a mind.

Following Patanjali, He explains the concept of dhyana further as

. An unbroken flow of knowledge in that object is Dhyâna.

The mind tries to think of one object, to hold itself to one particular spot, as the top of the head, the heart, etc., and if the mind succeeds in receiving the sensations only through that part of the body, and through no other part, that would be Dharana, and when the mind succeeds in keeping itself in that state for some time, it is called Dhyana (mediation).

So in deep meditation there should be no awareness of the external world as the mind is immersed in its own object of thought. Swamiji's biography has many such examples since His childhood.

2 added 696 characters in body
source | link

According to Patanjali, the stages of yoga are yama Niyama Asana Pranayaama Pratyahaara Dhaaranaa Dhyana and Samadhi. Pratyahara means withdrawal of the mind from external objects. The next stage is dharana, and then Dhyana. Patanjali's concept of dhyana has been explained by Swami Vivekananda as follows:

In order to reach the superconscious state in a scientific manner it is necessary to pass through the various steps of Raja-Yoga I have been teaching. After Pratyâhâra and Dhâranâ, we come to Dhyâna, meditation. When the mind has been trained to remain fixed on a certain internal or external location, there comes to it the power of flowing in an unbroken current, as it were, towards that point. This state is called Dhyana. When one has so intensified the power of Dhyana as to be able to reject the external part of perception and remain meditating only on the internal part, the meaning, that state is called Samadhi. The three — Dharana, Dhyana, and Samadhi — together, are called Samyama. That is, if the mind can first concentrate upon an object, and then is able to continue in that concentration for a length of time, and then, by continued concentration, to dwell only on the internal part of the perception of which the object was the effect, everything comes under the control of such a mind.

Following Patanjali, He explains the concept of dhyana further as

. An unbroken flow of knowledge in that object is Dhyâna.

The mind tries to think of one object, to hold itself to one particular spot, as the top of the head, the heart, etc., and if the mind succeeds in receiving the sensations only through that part of the body, and through no other part, that would be Dharana, and when the mind succeeds in keeping itself in that state for some time, it is called Dhyana (mediation).

So in real meditation there should be no awareness of the external world as the mind is immersed in its own object of thought. Swamiji's biography has many such examples since His childhood.

According to Patanjali, the stages of yoga are yama Niyama Asana Pranayaama Pratyahaara Dhaaranaa Dhyana and Samadhi. Pratyahara means withdrawal of the mind from external objects. The next stage is dharana, and then Dhyana. Patanjali's concept of dhyana has been explained by Swami Vivekananda as follows:

In order to reach the superconscious state in a scientific manner it is necessary to pass through the various steps of Raja-Yoga I have been teaching. After Pratyâhâra and Dhâranâ, we come to Dhyâna, meditation. When the mind has been trained to remain fixed on a certain internal or external location, there comes to it the power of flowing in an unbroken current, as it were, towards that point. This state is called Dhyana. When one has so intensified the power of Dhyana as to be able to reject the external part of perception and remain meditating only on the internal part, the meaning, that state is called Samadhi. The three — Dharana, Dhyana, and Samadhi — together, are called Samyama. That is, if the mind can first concentrate upon an object, and then is able to continue in that concentration for a length of time, and then, by continued concentration, to dwell only on the internal part of the perception of which the object was the effect, everything comes under the control of such a mind.

According to Patanjali, the stages of yoga are yama Niyama Asana Pranayaama Pratyahaara Dhaaranaa Dhyana and Samadhi. Pratyahara means withdrawal of the mind from external objects. The next stage is dharana, and then Dhyana. Patanjali's concept of dhyana has been explained by Swami Vivekananda as follows:

In order to reach the superconscious state in a scientific manner it is necessary to pass through the various steps of Raja-Yoga I have been teaching. After Pratyâhâra and Dhâranâ, we come to Dhyâna, meditation. When the mind has been trained to remain fixed on a certain internal or external location, there comes to it the power of flowing in an unbroken current, as it were, towards that point. This state is called Dhyana. When one has so intensified the power of Dhyana as to be able to reject the external part of perception and remain meditating only on the internal part, the meaning, that state is called Samadhi. The three — Dharana, Dhyana, and Samadhi — together, are called Samyama. That is, if the mind can first concentrate upon an object, and then is able to continue in that concentration for a length of time, and then, by continued concentration, to dwell only on the internal part of the perception of which the object was the effect, everything comes under the control of such a mind.

Following Patanjali, He explains the concept of dhyana further as

. An unbroken flow of knowledge in that object is Dhyâna.

The mind tries to think of one object, to hold itself to one particular spot, as the top of the head, the heart, etc., and if the mind succeeds in receiving the sensations only through that part of the body, and through no other part, that would be Dharana, and when the mind succeeds in keeping itself in that state for some time, it is called Dhyana (mediation).

So in real meditation there should be no awareness of the external world as the mind is immersed in its own object of thought. Swamiji's biography has many such examples since His childhood.

1
source | link

According to Patanjali, the stages of yoga are yama Niyama Asana Pranayaama Pratyahaara Dhaaranaa Dhyana and Samadhi. Pratyahara means withdrawal of the mind from external objects. The next stage is dharana, and then Dhyana. Patanjali's concept of dhyana has been explained by Swami Vivekananda as follows:

In order to reach the superconscious state in a scientific manner it is necessary to pass through the various steps of Raja-Yoga I have been teaching. After Pratyâhâra and Dhâranâ, we come to Dhyâna, meditation. When the mind has been trained to remain fixed on a certain internal or external location, there comes to it the power of flowing in an unbroken current, as it were, towards that point. This state is called Dhyana. When one has so intensified the power of Dhyana as to be able to reject the external part of perception and remain meditating only on the internal part, the meaning, that state is called Samadhi. The three — Dharana, Dhyana, and Samadhi — together, are called Samyama. That is, if the mind can first concentrate upon an object, and then is able to continue in that concentration for a length of time, and then, by continued concentration, to dwell only on the internal part of the perception of which the object was the effect, everything comes under the control of such a mind.