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The above answer is partially correct because Sveta Varaha kalpa can also be called padmaPadma kalpa. A kalpa is called padmaPadma when there is a manifestation of the universe from lotus. Sri Viswanath Chakarvarti Thakur writes on SB 3.11.37

"This verse describes the first day in the fifty-first year of Brahma, in the second half of his life. The Padma-kalpa (the previous day) is described in verses such as padmam kalpam atho srnu (SB 2.10.47) and the verses after udaplutam visvam idam (SB 3.8.10), with a description of a lotus in one ocean of water. The appearance of one Brahma with no one else present is described in vilokya tatranyad apasyamanah (SB 2.9.7) Thus, Brahma did not see Sanaka and the others who live for the whole of Brahma’s life.

Because of these verses, some have another explanation for the Padma-kalpa.

They say that Mahaloka, Janaloka, Tapoloka and Satyloka, which remain without being destroyed until the end of the second half of his life, become covered with water at the end of the first half of Brahma’s life (thus no planets or the great sages are not visible to Brahma on the first day of his fifty-first year). Those who live till the end of Brahma’s life on those planets enter into Narayana along with Brahma during the night at the end of the first half of Brahma’s life. They say that the first day in the second half of Brahma’s life (when he appears on a lotus and sees no planets and no sages) is called Sveta-varaha or Padma- kalpa. As well, in the next chapter it will be explained that Sanaka, Marici and others appeared from Brahma. This is similar to the Brahma-kalpa. That day cannot be called Brahma-kalpa since it comes after this description of the Padma-kalpa.

In verse 36 of this chapter, describing Padma-kalpa, the word ante can mean “at the end of the first day.” Thus the second day after Brahma’s birth could be called the Padma-kalpa. Ayam tu in this verse then means that the Padma-kalpa is also a name for the Varaha- kalpa, the first day in the second half of Brahma’s life. It is called Varaha-kalpa because Varaha avatara appeared during that kalpa. The word api after dvitiyasya indicates that even the first kalpa of Brahma’s life is called the Padma-kalpa. This is the explanation of some persons. "

In summary, this kalpa can also be called Padma because Sri Brahma recreated the planetary systems from the lotus in this kalpa.

The above answer is partially correct because Sveta Varaha kalpa can also be called padma kalpa. A kalpa is called padma when there is a manifestation of the universe from lotus. Sri Viswanath Chakarvarti Thakur writes on SB 3.11.37

"This verse describes the first day in the fifty-first year of Brahma, in the second half of his life. The Padma-kalpa (the previous day) is described in verses such as padmam kalpam atho srnu (SB 2.10.47) and the verses after udaplutam visvam idam (SB 3.8.10), with a description of a lotus in one ocean of water. The appearance of one Brahma with no one else present is described in vilokya tatranyad apasyamanah (SB 2.9.7) Thus, Brahma did not see Sanaka and the others who live for the whole of Brahma’s life.

Because of these verses, some have another explanation for the Padma-kalpa.

They say that Mahaloka, Janaloka, Tapoloka and Satyloka, which remain without being destroyed until the end of the second half of his life, become covered with water at the end of the first half of Brahma’s life (thus no planets or the great sages are not visible to Brahma on the first day of his fifty-first year). Those who live till the end of Brahma’s life on those planets enter into Narayana along with Brahma during the night at the end of the first half of Brahma’s life. They say that the first day in the second half of Brahma’s life (when he appears on a lotus and sees no planets and no sages) is called Sveta-varaha or Padma- kalpa. As well, in the next chapter it will be explained that Sanaka, Marici and others appeared from Brahma. This is similar to the Brahma-kalpa. That day cannot be called Brahma-kalpa since it comes after this description of the Padma-kalpa.

In verse 36 of this chapter, describing Padma-kalpa, the word ante can mean “at the end of the first day.” Thus the second day after Brahma’s birth could be called the Padma-kalpa. Ayam tu in this verse then means that the Padma-kalpa is also a name for the Varaha- kalpa, the first day in the second half of Brahma’s life. It is called Varaha-kalpa because Varaha avatara appeared during that kalpa. The word api after dvitiyasya indicates that even the first kalpa of Brahma’s life is called the Padma-kalpa. This is the explanation of some persons. "

In summary, this kalpa can also be called Padma because Sri Brahma recreated the planetary systems from the lotus in this kalpa.

The above answer is partially correct because Sveta Varaha kalpa can also be called Padma kalpa. A kalpa is called Padma when there is a manifestation of the universe from lotus. Sri Viswanath Chakarvarti Thakur writes on SB 3.11.37

"This verse describes the first day in the fifty-first year of Brahma, in the second half of his life. The Padma-kalpa (the previous day) is described in verses such as padmam kalpam atho srnu (SB 2.10.47) and the verses after udaplutam visvam idam (SB 3.8.10), with a description of a lotus in one ocean of water. The appearance of one Brahma with no one else present is described in vilokya tatranyad apasyamanah (SB 2.9.7) Thus, Brahma did not see Sanaka and the others who live for the whole of Brahma’s life.

Because of these verses, some have another explanation for the Padma-kalpa.

They say that Mahaloka, Janaloka, Tapoloka and Satyloka, which remain without being destroyed until the end of the second half of his life, become covered with water at the end of the first half of Brahma’s life (thus no planets or the great sages are not visible to Brahma on the first day of his fifty-first year). Those who live till the end of Brahma’s life on those planets enter into Narayana along with Brahma during the night at the end of the first half of Brahma’s life. They say that the first day in the second half of Brahma’s life (when he appears on a lotus and sees no planets and no sages) is called Sveta-varaha or Padma- kalpa. As well, in the next chapter it will be explained that Sanaka, Marici and others appeared from Brahma. This is similar to the Brahma-kalpa. That day cannot be called Brahma-kalpa since it comes after this description of the Padma-kalpa.

In verse 36 of this chapter, describing Padma-kalpa, the word ante can mean “at the end of the first day.” Thus the second day after Brahma’s birth could be called the Padma-kalpa. Ayam tu in this verse then means that the Padma-kalpa is also a name for the Varaha- kalpa, the first day in the second half of Brahma’s life. It is called Varaha-kalpa because Varaha avatara appeared during that kalpa. The word api after dvitiyasya indicates that even the first kalpa of Brahma’s life is called the Padma-kalpa. This is the explanation of some persons. "

In summary, this kalpa can also be called Padma because Sri Brahma recreated the planetary systems from the lotus in this kalpa.

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The above answer is partially correct because Sveta Varaha kalpa can also be called padma kalpa. A kalpa is called padma when there is a manifestation of the universe from lotus. Sri Viswanath Chakarvarti Thakur writes on SB 3.11.37

"This verse describes the first day in the fifty-first year of Brahma, in the second half of his life. The Padma-kalpa (the previous day) is described in verses such as padmam kalpam atho srnu (SB 2.10.47) and the verses after udaplutam visvam idam (SB 3.8.10), with a description of a lotus in one ocean of water. The appearance of one Brahma with no one else present is described in vilokya tatranyad apasyamanah (SB 2.9.7) Thus, Brahma did not see Sanaka and the others who live for the whole of Brahma’s life.

Because of these verses, some have another explanation for the Padma-kalpa.

They say that Mahaloka, Janaloka, Tapoloka and Satyloka, which remain without being destroyed until the end of the second half of his life, become covered with water at the end of the first half of Brahma’s life (thus no planets or the great sages are not visible to Brahma on the first day of his fifty-first year). Those who live till the end of Brahma’s life on those planets enter into Narayana along with Brahma during the night at the end of the first half of Brahma’s life. They say that the first day in the second half of Brahma’s life (when he appears on a lotus and sees no planets and no sages) is called Sveta-varaha or Padma- kalpa. As well, in the next chapter it will be explained that Sanaka, Marici and others appeared from Brahma. This is similar to the Brahma-kalpa. That day cannot be called Brahma-kalpa since it comes after this description of the Padma-kalpa.

In verse 36 of this chapter, describing Padma-kalpa, the word ante can mean “at the end of the first day.” Thus the second day after Brahma’s birth could be called the Padma-kalpa. Ayam tu in this verse then means that the Padma-kalpa is also a name for the Varaha- kalpa, the first day in the second half of Brahma’s life. It is called Varaha-kalpa because Varaha avatara appeared during that kalpa. The word api after dvitiyasya indicates that even the first kalpa of Brahma’s life is called the Padma-kalpa. This is the explanation of some persons. "

In summary, this kalpa can also be called Padma because Sri Brahma recreated the planetary systems from the lotus in this kalpa.