2 added 2 characters in body
source | link

The answer to this question is given in scripture itself and in the writings of the greats. Scripture can be regarded as scripture only if it is reasonable.

Bhisma said in Mahabharata

'Even the words heard from an ignorant person, if in themselves they be fraught with sense, come to be regarded as pious and wise. In days of old, Usanas said unto the Daityas this truth, which should remove all doubts, that scriptures are no scriptures if they cannot stand the test of reason.'

Mahabharata Santi Parva Section CXLII

Acharya Shankara, for example, in his Gita Bhasya says:

"The appeal to the infallibility of the Vedic injunction is misconceived. The infallibility in question refers only to the unseen forces or apurva, and is admissible only in regards to matters not confined to the sphere of direct perceptions, etc. ..... Even a hundred statements of sruti to the effect that fire is cold and non-luminous won't prove valid. If it does make such a statement, its import will have to be interpreted differently. Otherwise, validity won't attach to it. Nothing in conflict with the means of valid cognition or with its own statements may be imputed to sruti."

REF: Srimad Bhagavad Gita Bhasya of Sri Sankaracarya 18.66 translation by Dr. A. G. Krishna Warrier, p629;

Yoga Vasistha Ramayan says:

“The remark of a child is to be accepted, if it is in accordance with reason; but the remark of even Brahma Himself, the creator of the world is to be rejected like a piece of straw if it does not accord with reason.

REF: Vasistha's Yoga II.18 translated by Swami Venkatesananda, p 35;

Sri Vacaspati Misra, another Advaita Vedanta philosopher, says,

"Even one thousand scriptural statements cannot transform a jar into a piece of cloth".

REf: quoted by Radhakrishnan in his book, 'Indian Philosophy'.

Manu Smriti (4.176) advises discarding traditions and customs which offend people.

However, discard the desire (kama) and material wealth (artha) if contrary to Dharma; as also, any usage or custom or rules regarded as source of Dharma if at any time they were to lead to unhappiness or arouse people's indignation.

(Manu Smriti 4.176)

However, discard the desire (kama) and material wealth (artha) if contrary to Dharma; as also, any usage or custom or rules regarded as source of Dharma if at any time they were to lead to unhappiness or arouse people's indignation.

Swami Vivekananda has advised rejection of those parts of Smritis and Puranas that are offensive.

The Smritis and the Puranas are productions of men of limited intelligence and are full of fallacies, errors, the feelings of class and malice. Only parts of them breathing broadness of spirit and love are acceptable, the rest are to be rejected. The Upanishads and the Gita are the true scriptures.

The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda/Volume 6/Epistles - Second Series/CXXIV

The answer to this question is given in scripture itself and in the writings of the greats. Scripture can be regarded as scripture only if it is reasonable.

Bhisma said in Mahabharata

'Even the words heard from an ignorant person, if in themselves they be fraught with sense, come to be regarded as pious and wise. In days of old, Usanas said unto the Daityas this truth, which should remove all doubts, that scriptures are no scriptures if they cannot stand the test of reason.'

Mahabharata Santi Parva Section CXLII

Acharya Shankara, for example, in his Gita Bhasya says:

"The appeal to the infallibility of the Vedic injunction is misconceived. The infallibility in question refers only to the unseen forces or apurva, and is admissible only in regards to matters not confined to the sphere of direct perceptions, etc. ..... Even a hundred statements of sruti to the effect that fire is cold and non-luminous won't prove valid. If it does make such a statement, its import will have to be interpreted differently. Otherwise, validity won't attach to it. Nothing in conflict with the means of valid cognition or with its own statements may be imputed to sruti."

REF: Srimad Bhagavad Gita Bhasya of Sri Sankaracarya 18.66 translation by Dr. A. G. Krishna Warrier, p629;

Yoga Vasistha Ramayan says:

“The remark of a child is to be accepted, if it is in accordance with reason; but the remark of even Brahma Himself, the creator of the world is to be rejected like a piece of straw if it does not accord with reason.

REF: Vasistha's Yoga II.18 translated by Swami Venkatesananda, p 35;

Sri Vacaspati Misra, another Advaita Vedanta philosopher, says,

"Even one thousand scriptural statements cannot transform a jar into a piece of cloth".

REf: quoted by Radhakrishnan in his book, 'Indian Philosophy'.

Manu Smriti advises discarding traditions and customs which offend people.

However, discard the desire (kama) and material wealth (artha) if contrary to Dharma; as also, any usage or custom or rules regarded as source of Dharma if at any time they were to lead to unhappiness or arouse people's indignation.

(Manu Smriti 4.176)

Swami Vivekananda has advised rejection of those parts of Smritis and Puranas that are offensive.

The Smritis and the Puranas are productions of men of limited intelligence and are full of fallacies, errors, the feelings of class and malice. Only parts of them breathing broadness of spirit and love are acceptable, the rest are to be rejected. The Upanishads and the Gita are the true scriptures.

The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda/Volume 6/Epistles - Second Series/CXXIV

The answer to this question is given in scripture itself and in the writings of the greats. Scripture can be regarded as scripture only if it is reasonable.

Bhisma said in Mahabharata

'Even the words heard from an ignorant person, if in themselves they be fraught with sense, come to be regarded as pious and wise. In days of old, Usanas said unto the Daityas this truth, which should remove all doubts, that scriptures are no scriptures if they cannot stand the test of reason.'

Mahabharata Santi Parva Section CXLII

Acharya Shankara, for example, in his Gita Bhasya says:

"The appeal to the infallibility of the Vedic injunction is misconceived. The infallibility in question refers only to the unseen forces or apurva, and is admissible only in regards to matters not confined to the sphere of direct perceptions, etc. ..... Even a hundred statements of sruti to the effect that fire is cold and non-luminous won't prove valid. If it does make such a statement, its import will have to be interpreted differently. Otherwise, validity won't attach to it. Nothing in conflict with the means of valid cognition or with its own statements may be imputed to sruti."

REF: Srimad Bhagavad Gita Bhasya of Sri Sankaracarya 18.66 translation by Dr. A. G. Krishna Warrier, p629;

Yoga Vasistha Ramayan says:

“The remark of a child is to be accepted, if it is in accordance with reason; but the remark of even Brahma Himself, the creator of the world is to be rejected like a piece of straw if it does not accord with reason.

REF: Vasistha's Yoga II.18 translated by Swami Venkatesananda, p 35;

Sri Vacaspati Misra, another Advaita Vedanta philosopher, says,

"Even one thousand scriptural statements cannot transform a jar into a piece of cloth".

REf: quoted by Radhakrishnan in his book, 'Indian Philosophy'.

Manu Smriti (4.176) advises discarding traditions and customs which offend people.

However, discard the desire (kama) and material wealth (artha) if contrary to Dharma; as also, any usage or custom or rules regarded as source of Dharma if at any time they were to lead to unhappiness or arouse people's indignation.

Swami Vivekananda has advised rejection of those parts of Smritis and Puranas that are offensive.

The Smritis and the Puranas are productions of men of limited intelligence and are full of fallacies, errors, the feelings of class and malice. Only parts of them breathing broadness of spirit and love are acceptable, the rest are to be rejected. The Upanishads and the Gita are the true scriptures.

The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda/Volume 6/Epistles - Second Series/CXXIV

1
source | link

The answer to this question is given in scripture itself and in the writings of the greats. Scripture can be regarded as scripture only if it is reasonable.

Bhisma said in Mahabharata

'Even the words heard from an ignorant person, if in themselves they be fraught with sense, come to be regarded as pious and wise. In days of old, Usanas said unto the Daityas this truth, which should remove all doubts, that scriptures are no scriptures if they cannot stand the test of reason.'

Mahabharata Santi Parva Section CXLII

Acharya Shankara, for example, in his Gita Bhasya says:

"The appeal to the infallibility of the Vedic injunction is misconceived. The infallibility in question refers only to the unseen forces or apurva, and is admissible only in regards to matters not confined to the sphere of direct perceptions, etc. ..... Even a hundred statements of sruti to the effect that fire is cold and non-luminous won't prove valid. If it does make such a statement, its import will have to be interpreted differently. Otherwise, validity won't attach to it. Nothing in conflict with the means of valid cognition or with its own statements may be imputed to sruti."

REF: Srimad Bhagavad Gita Bhasya of Sri Sankaracarya 18.66 translation by Dr. A. G. Krishna Warrier, p629;

Yoga Vasistha Ramayan says:

“The remark of a child is to be accepted, if it is in accordance with reason; but the remark of even Brahma Himself, the creator of the world is to be rejected like a piece of straw if it does not accord with reason.

REF: Vasistha's Yoga II.18 translated by Swami Venkatesananda, p 35;

Sri Vacaspati Misra, another Advaita Vedanta philosopher, says,

"Even one thousand scriptural statements cannot transform a jar into a piece of cloth".

REf: quoted by Radhakrishnan in his book, 'Indian Philosophy'.

Manu Smriti advises discarding traditions and customs which offend people.

However, discard the desire (kama) and material wealth (artha) if contrary to Dharma; as also, any usage or custom or rules regarded as source of Dharma if at any time they were to lead to unhappiness or arouse people's indignation.

(Manu Smriti 4.176)

Swami Vivekananda has advised rejection of those parts of Smritis and Puranas that are offensive.

The Smritis and the Puranas are productions of men of limited intelligence and are full of fallacies, errors, the feelings of class and malice. Only parts of them breathing broadness of spirit and love are acceptable, the rest are to be rejected. The Upanishads and the Gita are the true scriptures.

The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda/Volume 6/Epistles - Second Series/CXXIV