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It is widely believed that keeping a copy of Mahabharata at home is not good. Can anyone tell me the reason behind this?

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    It's an old folklore mainly in (northern) India, probably due to dis-harmony shown within a family. There is lots of animosity, deceits, killings in it. I was also said by so many elders. Though I don't disregard their advise, my counter-argument was: "In older times, if the book of MahAbhArata was restricted then how is it relevant today? The complete literature is on internet as well as TV shows. And we have internet and TV both!" Practically there is no way that access to MahAbhArata is restrictible in modern households. BTW, I then kept BR Chopra's full set of CDs. :) Interesting question. – iammilind Mar 2 '16 at 13:11
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    Some people also believe one should not read or listen to Bhagavad Gita or Garuda Purana. It's meant for "after retirement" or when one's on their deathbed. One complaint always cited for not reading Bhagavad Gita is that youngsters will abandon all social life and become a sannyasi. The counter argument for that is: Arjuna who directly listened to the Gita did not become one ;) – sv. Mar 2 '16 at 15:12
  • I have never read or heard about such a thing.Can anyone post a webpage link containing such instructions ? – Rickross Mar 2 '16 at 18:19
  • What about Ramayana?Is a copy of it allowed to be kept at home? – Rickross Mar 2 '16 at 18:27
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    Ramayana, Mahabharata are the epics of our country. They should be in every home and should be known to every Hindu. There is no problem if you keep a copy of Mahabharata in your home. – Sarvabhouma Apr 16 '16 at 19:44
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Gita Press Gorakhpur has published Mahabharata (with Hindi Translation) in 6 volumes. In its last volume (6th vol) p. 6595, shloka 89 reads as

"Bharatam Bhavane Yasya tasya hastagato Jayah"
Translation: In whichever home this Mahabharat Grantha (book) is there, victory is in his (home owner's) hands.

So, it may not be true that the book cannot be kept at home.


EDIT:

Original Sanskrit verse from Mahabharata Māhātmya and its Hindi translation:

[Sanskrit verse:]

अस्मिन्नर्थश्च कामश्च निखिलेनोपदेक्ष्यते ।
इतिहासे महापुण्ये बुद्धिश्च परिनैष्ठिकी ॥

भारतं शृणुयान्नित्यं भारतं परिकीर्तयेत् ।
भारतं भवने यस्य तस्य हस्तगतो जयः ॥

[Hindi translation:]

इस महान् पवित्र इतिहासमें अर्थ और कामका ऐसा सर्वाङ्गपूर्ण उपदेश है कि जिससे इसे पढ़ने-सुननेवालेकी बुद्धि परमात्मामें परिनिष्ठित हो जाती है । अतएव महाभारतका श्रवण-कीर्तन सदा करना चाहिये । जिसके घर महाभारतका श्रवण-कीर्तन होता है, उसके विजय तो हस्तगत ही है।

  • It doesn't look like the Hindi translation is talking about keeping the Mahabharata book at home. – sv. May 18 '18 at 16:23
  • Mahabharat 6th Khanda, P. 6515, Shloka 89 is: भारतं शृणुयान्नित्यं भारतं परिकीर्तयेत् । भारतं भवने यस्य तस्य हस्तगतो जयः ॥ Its Hindi translation in the book (as referred to above, p. 6515) is:प्रतिदिन महाभारत सुने। नित्यप्रति महाभारत का पाठ करे | जिसके घर में महाभारत ग्रन्थ मौजूद है, विजय उसके हाथ में है | The Hindi translation of "भारतं भवने यस्य तस्य हस्तगतो जयः" is definitely not "जिसके घर महाभारतका श्रवण-कीर्तन होता है, उसके विजय तो हस्तगत ही है". The rest you may look into the book as I have referred to and decide for yourself. – Sudhanshu K Mishra May 19 '18 at 15:06
  • Please post the pic of the page. It's possible you're referring to newer version of the book. The Hindi translation I added in my edit is also from Gita Press but an older version (1965 or earlier). Feel free to edit/update the translation. – sv. May 19 '18 at 15:46
  • ! skmishra.net/Mahabharat-6515.jpg "Print of the Page" – Sudhanshu K Mishra May 19 '18 at 18:14

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