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In Swami Muktananda's autobiography, "Play of Consciousness" he refers to having visions of himself in one short chapter.

I began to have a new experience. As the lights appeared in meditation, I would see myself sitting opposite, even when I opened my eyes. Sometimes, when I had been doing tasks before meditating, I would see myself doing them in meditation. If I had been wandering in the orange orchard, I would see myself strolling here and there. This was another source of wonder for me.

[...]

Later, I learned from certain books on yoga that this is called “ pratika-darshan ”, vision of one’s own form, and that it is a sign of complete purification of the body. My body was now very thin, but full of energy. I was still meditating.

In my searches on the Internet at least I've been unable to find any other book that talks about this.

I'd appreciate help in finding more information on this phenomenon. Ideally the books on Yoga referred to by Swami Muktananda.

  • to clarify, you want books which contains similar account? or do you want an explanation of how to attain such a state? or do you want to know about that state in general? or do you just want to hear experiences of similar states? Thanks – Sai May 13 '16 at 18:52
  • I'd like to know about the state in general. But other kinds of information would not be unwelcome, though less of interest to me. Thank you. – Buddho May 16 '16 at 8:54
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It is a tough call how to discern between vision and imagination. To put it very simply - if there is no noise, you clean your mind, there is room for visions, because they are subtle. Imagination comes from your memory, vision "directly", being something new, as let's inspiration of a painter. Awareness works through the organs of senses (5 external, 5 internal). It is usually vision + one more. Awareness is like looking out. You cannot look at yourself. Also, self has no form. There is nothing to see. However, it is possible to feel it. It is becoming conscious about consciousness. Certain "states" are not goals. Experience is worth of something, if it teaches you something and you can repeat it.

Some of the information contained in this post requires additional references. Please edit to add citations to reliable sources that support the assertions made here. Unsourced material may be disputed or deleted.

  • Welcome to Hinduism StackExchange! You should cite some sources. – Paṇḍyā May 1 '18 at 15:10

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