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I have notice and seen, and also everybody knows about 'shrimad' before the bhagvadgeeta.

shrimad title is also used before title of shrimad bhaagwat and rishi's like shrimad adi shankaracharya.

I want to ask what is the meaning of title and how people use to call this title upon the name of people and scriptures.

And how many people and scriptures hold this title.

https://in.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20110928235250AAwULnI

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Shri denotes, among many other things, prosperity, splendour, beauty , abundance.

In Mantra Vidya adding a bindu to Shri makes the Rama (not Lord RAma) or the Lakshmi beejam. Which is the beejam for abundance, wealth and also prosperity.

Shri or Shriman or Shrimad is often added before a name to show respect. Shrimad denotes one who is ( or which is ) endowed with Shri.

There is a tradition of adding Shri or Shrimad before the names of Holy Texts , Holy places and also before the names of Gurus and Acharyas.

Here is what Lord Shiva orders in the KulArnava Tantram :

SriGurum KulashAstrAni PujyasthAnAni YAni cha || BhaktyA Sripurvakam Devi Pranamya Parikirtayeth||

Hey Devi, Guru, Kula Shastras and Pujyasthana ( holy places or places that are worthy of worship ), while addressing any of these three the word "Sri" should be added at the start and they should be addressed only after prostrating before them with devotion.

KulArnava Tantram, Chapter 11, Verse 43.

That is why we say Sri XYZ Purana, or Sri Bhagavat Gita and not just Gita. Similarly we should say Sri Kashi Kshetra instead of simply saying Kashi.

For Acharyas and Gurus like Sri Adi Shankara too we should also follow the same.

Take for example the Sukra Chaturvimsati Nama Stotram found in the Skanda Purana . It ends like this :

||iti śrīskāndapurāṇē śrī śukracaturviṃśatināmastōtraṃ sampūrṇam||

So, Shri is added before both the Purana's and Sukra's names. It just shows respect . And, Shrimad is just a variant of Shri with both the words being used for exactly the same purpose.

  • From what little I know, "resplendent ___" is a good approximation. – Rubellite Yakṣī Apr 8 '18 at 23:17
  • Yes that is one meaning. Actually a Sanskrit word can have many meanings. @RubelliteFae – Rickross Apr 11 '18 at 5:23
  • Oh, yes, of course. I was just providing another. – Rubellite Yakṣī Apr 11 '18 at 5:37
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Srimad is prefixed not only for auspicious and noble scriptures but also for eminent and noble scholars also.

1) श्रीमत्:

श्रीमत् zrImat adj. of high rank or dignity

श्रीमत् zrImat adj. decorated with the insignia of royalty

श्रीमत् zrImat adj. venerable

श्रीमत् zrImat adj. fortunate

श्रीमत् zrImat adj. glorious

श्रीमत् zrImat adj. pleasant

श्रीमत् zrImat adj. prosperous

श्रीमत् zrImat adj. illustrious

श्रीमत् zrImat adj. auspicious

श्रीमत् zrImat adj. possessed of fortune

श्रीमत् zrImat adj. lovely

श्रीमत् zrImat adj. beautiful

श्रीमत् zrImat adj. splendid

श्रीमत् zrImat adj. charming

श्रीमत् zrImat adj. eminent

Examples:

Srimad Ramanuja

Srimad Azhagiya Singar

Srimad Andavan Swamigal

Srimad Ramanuja Siddhanta Nirdhaarana Saarva bouma

Srimad Bodhendra Desikendra namosthuthey

2) श्रीमद:

श्रीमद zrImada m. intoxication produced by wealth or prosperity

Example:

Shrimad akalanka paripurna shashikoti (Nrisimha Ashtakam)

He (Lord Narasimha) is like billions of full moons without any stains Source(s): http://www.celextel.org/stotras/vishnu/n...

http://www.prapatti.com/slokas/sanskrit/...

https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%...

https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.prapatti.com%2Fslokas%2Fsanskrit%2Fnrisimhaashtakam.pdf

  • My friend you just copy pasted the answer from the yahoo answer link i provided if you have some other sources or know about it thoroughly then please edit your answer accordingly and correctly. – Abhishek Gurjar Oct 10 '16 at 9:20
  • Ohh, I didnot saw your link, will come across with a better answer this time. – Aman Garg Oct 10 '16 at 9:22
  • What is "zrImat" ? – SwiftPushkar Oct 10 '16 at 9:43

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