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First line of the following verse is used in Ayurveda and Surya Namaskaras to substantiate significance of Lord Surya as bestower of good health.

Arogyam bhaskarad ichcheth
Sriyam ichcheth uthasanath
Iswarath jnana manvichcheth
Moksham ichcheth janardanath

If you want just health, you have to worship the lord in the form of Sun. And if you want just wealth, you need to worship the lord through the fire. But if you want just knowledge, you have to worship Lord Shiva. But if you want a release from all bondages, you need to worship the Lord in the form of Vishnu.

A Google search of this verse gave link to Sri Venkateswara University Oriental journal, where the journal says verse is present in Bagavata Purana 4.29 42. (Footnote of Page 15)

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I searched Bhagavatam 4.29 42 from Vedabase but i couldn't find this verse. Does anyone know which scriptures contain this verse?

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There is slightly different version is available in Matsya Purana, Chapter 68.

आरोग्यं भास्करादिच्छेद्धनमिच्छेद्धुताशनात्।
ईश्वराज्ज्ञानमन्विच्छेन्मोक्षमिच्छेज्जनार्दनात्॥ ४१॥

ārogyaṃ bhāskarādiccheddhanamiccheddhutāśanāt /

īśvarājjñānam anvicchenmokṣam icchejjanārdanāt // (41)

Health ought to be sought from the Sun, wealth from Agni, knowledge from Isvara, and emancipation from Janardana.

  • Thanks! I will wait for other answers and see whether exact verse is available or not. This is almost same except one word... Dhanam instead of Sriyam.. – The Destroyer Oct 25 '16 at 19:28
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The verse which gives the same meaning occurs in the Padma Purana Srishti Kanda Chapter 34. This is said to Sage Pulastya to Bhishma. But the Sanskrit verse has variation.

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327-328 O lord of kings, he would fulfil all his desires with little effort. One should seek knowledge from Sankara, and (good) health from Bhaskara (i.e. the Sun). One should desire wealth from Hutasana (i.e. Fire), and position from Janardana (i.e. Visnu). One should seek Vedic (i.e. sacred knowledge), giving peace to all beings, from the grandsire.

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