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I have hindu friend who eats non vegetarian but also a good follower of Lord Krishna. By the term good follower, I mean to say he prays to krishna and sometime goes to temple to attend prayers and kirtan of lord krishna.

Is it ok for him to eat non veg and still pray to god.

marked as duplicate by The Destroyer, sv., Paṇḍyā, Sarvabhouma, SwiftPushkar Dec 11 '16 at 16:15

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    Related hinduism.stackexchange.com/questions/97/… – Bhargav Rao Dec 10 '16 at 12:08
  • "Is it ok for him to eat non veg and still pray to god." -- Ofcourse yes. Praying to the god is always good, irrespective of veg or non-veg. Food habits should be incorporated according to the geography & circumstances. If someone eats non-veg for taste buds, then it's not right. Similarly, those who eat veg and despise non-veg people are also not right. In today's time of global warming, veg can make a good difference. Irrespective of that God neither accepts anyone's good deeds nor bad deeds (sins) [Gita 5.15], but is surely interested in the devotion. – iammilind Dec 10 '16 at 14:19
  • You can see this answer, although it says 'simple mental offering wouldn't work', I doubt if most Hindus do yagna or sacrifice these days. – sv. Dec 10 '16 at 16:18
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    It is ok to eat meat and still worship God.There have been so many people who have done that already.By worshiping Gods we get rid of our sins.So,if you consider eating meat a sin then you have even more reasons to pray to him.And everyone has the right to pray to God including even sinners..But a God-fearing hindu shud never consume beef..Having said all this, not eating meat is of course the ideal behavior and it has been praised all throughout Hindu scriptures.. – Rickross Dec 11 '16 at 4:35
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    "So only option to get rid of past punya fal ...", @Rishabh, whatever you wrote here, is correct & as per BG. Whichever phala we offer to God gets nullified, irrespective of punya - pApa. Now, what is the meaning of "offering fruit of karma"? -- It means, doing the action (karma) as of they were destined by supreme & hence not worrying about its reaction (karma-phala). Ex: If a captain asks a fast bowler to spin ball, then it's Karma for bowler. If bowler dutifully spin bowls, regardless of being hit to boundaries, then it is "offering Karma phala" to captain. Crux of karma yoga! – iammilind Sep 28 '17 at 7:47

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