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We know that in the Vedic Dharma the SikhA and the Upavita (the sacred thread) are indispensable. Without tying SikhA, for example, no Vedic ritual can be successfully completed.

We also know that the SikhA should be sported on the head. But at what part of the head? At the top of it? Like Lord Shiva and others shown below has done:

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Or at the back part of the head like the following modern day Brahmin has done:

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Q- As per scriptures at what part of one's head one should tie SikhA knot? At the top or at the back of it?

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    Different traditions have different places & types. For some vaishnavas, it is at back of head, after shaving off everything 4 fingers wide on all sides. For others, it is small tuft on top of head. Same for some smarthas, while for other smarthas, they have full head of hair pulled back, without any shaving. In North India, most of them have just a few locks of hair from back of head, that is not tied up. – ram Sep 5 '17 at 3:22
  • @ram Such comments don't help. If u know the answer from scriptures then do answer it. – Rickross Sep 5 '17 at 4:13
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    Shiva has matted locks(Jhata). Rama and Lakshmana also had matted hair when they went to exile. They should be tied upwards because during the exile, no oil or cleanin the hair should be done. Shikha is different from this. Shikha should be there in order to cover our brahma randhra. People from different regions follow different styles. E.g Some Nayanars followed upward following their cultural way. In general, it is the same way like the children in the pics are following. As @ram said in the comment, some shave the remaining hair while some don't. – Sarvabhouma Sep 5 '17 at 4:41
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    @Rickross, it might be helpful for some people reading comments suppose no one answers from scriptures – ram Sep 5 '17 at 6:23
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    That is fine.. not all comments are speculation. the practices of elders is also valid. Manu says that himself, so does Yudhistira.. when scriptures are confusing, follow your ancestral traditions. Anyway, @RakeshJoshi posted scriptural reference for both the brahma-randhra shikha and urdhva-shikha that i mentioned. – ram Sep 5 '17 at 6:58

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