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Yajnavalkya is an ancient rishi who is associated with many texts in Sanskrit such as the Shatapatha Brahmana, Shukla Yajurveda and the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad. His discussions with Raja Janaka of Videha are quite well-known.

This Hindupedia page mentions two things about his origins - One that he was an incarnation of Brahma and son of Brahmabahu and Second, he was the son of Devarata. But it also says that there may have been different people of the same name.

I want to know the correct genealogy of Yajnavalkya, the guru of Raja Janaka. I am aware of his two wives Maitreyi & Katyayini but would like to know about his progeny as well.

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    One clarification here, was this Janaka same who was Sita's father or any other king in that lineage? – YDS Dec 27 '17 at 14:46
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    Yajnavalkya's guru Vaishampayana was pupil of Krishna Dvaipāyana. And Yajnavalkya learnt the science of the Self from Hiranyanabha, a king of the Raghu Dynasty and a teacher of yoga. Hiranyanabha incarnated around 15 generations after lord Shri Rama. Most of the kings of Mithila are referred as Janaka, so I think this Janaka might not be same who was Sita's father. – YDS Jan 1 '18 at 13:35
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    Being an incarnation doesn't necessarily imply no lineage. Krishna was an incarnation born in the Lunar Dynasty and Rama was born in the SOlar Dynasty. Irrespective of which Janak he taught I am more concerned about Yajnavalkya's past and future rather than that of the king he mentored. – Dr. Vineet Aggarwal Jan 2 '18 at 5:10
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    The question is about Brahmabahu's son not Brahmabahu himself so yes I am interested in the correct lineage. If Yajnavalkya's father was indeed born of Brahma's arms why isn't he mentioned conclusively in any creation description along with Manas Putras, Kardama etc.? Rhetorical questions don't work as answers on this website and if you find something to support the link I myself shared that would be more helpful rather than a train of discussion without any supporting references. – Dr. Vineet Aggarwal Jan 3 '18 at 5:06
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    Yes you can ask as many questions as you want as long as they are leading towards an answer that is supported by scriptural evidence. Picking up stuff from the question itself doesn't really help in doing that since the one asking the question knows what he has put and is looking for information beyond what he has already shared. – Dr. Vineet Aggarwal Jan 3 '18 at 8:37

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