6

From this answer, I found

The celebrated Pandu, tempted by the desire of having more children wished to speak again unto his wedded wife (for invoking some other god). But Kunti addressed him, saying, 'The wise do not sanction a fourth delivery even in a season of distress. The woman having intercourse with four different men is called a Swairini (heanton), while she having intercourse with five becometh a harlot. Therefore, O learned one, as thou art well-acquainted with the scripture on this subject, ...

Actually this is like a definition of a harlot or prostitute. I am interested to know which scripture (Possibly Smritis) other than this one, declares so - that a woman having intercourse with 5 different men is prostitute?

  • Not denying your reference of the verse from Mahabharata, if these were Kunti's word to her husband, why she would not have a fifth child from yet another God (her eldest Karna born of Surya Deva) - is it not surprising that she had no hesitation in making her Daughter-in-law Panchali a harlot, by asking her to have intercourse with all the five Pandavas? Kunti is revered as one of the Pancha Kanyas remembering whom daily destroys great sins - the others being Ahalya, Draupadi, Tara and Mandodari - hence I feel that verse referred to above may not be fully correct - words or interpretation – Suresh Ramaswamy Jan 3 '18 at 7:25
7

The Devi Bhagavata Purana says so.

In the Purana's 35th Chapter of the 9th Book,, Yamaraja says:

1-44. Dharmarâjan said :-- O Chaste One! Without serving the Gods, the Karma ties can never be severed. The pure acts are the seeds of purities and the impure acts lead to impure seeds. If any Brâhmana goes to any unchaste woman and eats her food, he will have to go ultimately to the Kâlasûtra hell. There he lives for one hundred years when ultimately he gets a human birth when he passes his times as a diseased man and ultimately he gets purified. Those women who are addicted to their (one) husbands only are called Pativratâs. Those addicted to two persons are named Kulatâs; to three, are called Dharsinîs; to four, called Pums’chalîs; to five, six persons, called Ves’yâs; to seven, eight, nine persons are called Pungîs; and to more than these, are called Mahâves’yâs. The Mahâves’yâs are unfit to be touched by all the classes.

And "Veshya" in English is prostitute.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .