Bibek Debroy says in his Ramayana translation, 'Hanumat is a case in point, where Hanuman seemed to be too contrary to grammatical principles'.

What grammatical principle is that? Is it really Hanumat in the Sanskrit original?

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    Can you provide more context of that quote from bibek debroy. Hanuman is nominative/prathama of root word hanumat. sanskrit.inria.fr/cgi-bin/SKT/… – Aks Jan 2 at 15:40
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    Do you know if Debroy used the Critical Edition of Valimiki Ramayana for this translation? – sv. Jan 2 at 19:13
  • The Proto-Indo-European suffix that is the ancestor of Sanskrit -vat / -van is reconstructed as *-wn̥t, so either outcome is fine grammatically. – Aryaman Jan 3 at 2:20
  • Can you expand on what Bibek Debroy says? Hanumat is the root of Hanuman and there are forms like Hanumate, Hanumanta: etc., even as per the much later modern grammar of Panini. There is no confusion as per the grammar. – user1952500 Jan 3 at 2:53
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    Debroy translates the Critical Edition of Valmiki Ramayana. – Pradip Gangopadhyay Jan 3 at 10:52

In UTTARA KANDA of Valmiki Ramayana, all related words such as Hanumat, Hanumata, Hanumatah, Hanumataa, Hanumati and Hanumana etc. are mentioned based on the vibhakti:

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enter image description here It should also be noted that birth name of Hanumanji might be something different (may be Maaruti which is also derived from one of the names of Vayu Deva), the name Hanumanji is due to this reason:

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Thereupon beholding the huge bodied Airavat and considering him as a bigger fruit Maruti ran towards him.

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Belaboured by the thunder bolt of Indra Hanuman fell down and broke his left jaw.

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