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As I discuss in this answer, each of the four Vedas consists of four parts: Samhitas, which consist of mantras addressed to the Devas; Brahmanas, which consist of instructions for public Yagnas; Aranyakas, which consist of instructions for Yagnas done in the forest; and Upanishads, which consists of philosophical teachings. And each of the four Vedas also comes in multiple Shakhas or recensions, which I discuss here. Each Shakha has its own Samhita, Brahmana, Aranyaka, and Upanishad.

Now the Shukla Yajur Veda used to have many Shakhas, but only two survive: the Madhyandina Shakha and the Kanva Shakha. That means the the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad, which is part of the Shatapatha Brahmana of the Shukla Yajur Veda, has two surviving versions: the Madhyandina Shakha's version and the Kanva Shakha's version. Now the Kanva Shakha's version of the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad has many English translations, for instance this one. That's because all the major commentators, like Adi Shankaracharya, Madhvacharya, Ranga Ramanuja, etc., have all commented on the Kanva Shakha's version for some reason. But my question is, is the Madhyandina Shakha's version of the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad available in English?

Now there is an English translation of the Madhayandina Shakha's version of the Shatapatha Brahmana, which contains the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad within it, but the translator chose not to translate the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad portion. But did anyone else translate it?

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    where is the sanskrit version ? upanishad dont have shakhas – Rakesh Joshi Jan 18 '18 at 23:31
  • @RakeshJoshi The Brihadaranyaka Upanishad is part of the Shatapatha Brahmana, and the Shatapatha Brahmana is found in both the Madhyandina Shakha and the Kanva Shakha of the Shukla Yajur Veda. So because of that, the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad has two different versions. In any case, here is the Madhyandina Shakha's version of the Shatapatha Brahmana in Sanskrit: archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.283077 The Brihadaranyaka Upanishad is at the end of that. – Keshav Srinivasan Jan 19 '18 at 4:10
  • is there a difference of content in both ? Because this is a part of aranyaka it may have. Else nornal upanishad dont have shakha differences. – Rakesh Joshi Jan 19 '18 at 10:59
  • @RakeshJoshi Yes, there some differences in content. That's because there are differences between the Madhyandina Shakha's version of the Shatapatha Brahmana and the Kanva Shakha's version of the Shatapatha Brahmana. One example of a difference is something discussed in Adhyaya 3 Pada 3 of the Brahma Sutras. One version of the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad says "Rinsing the mouth with water provides clothing for the Prana, so you should rinse your mouth with water." The other version omits the "so you should rinse your mouth with water" part. The Brahma Sutras analyze that omitted part. – Keshav Srinivasan Jan 19 '18 at 11:24

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