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Can I still be a Hindu, if I do not believe in any form of rituals or prayers to god?

Can I still be a Hindu if I have no knowledge of Vedic scriptures and Sanskrit?

So , basically my point is did I become a Hindu just because my parents are Hindu?

Note: I do not follow any Abrahamic faith.

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    You maybe interested in this post on meta. Feb 2 '18 at 16:26
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    Your note is the answer: "I do not follow any Abrahamic faith." - this alone is enough to qualify you as a Hindu (even if you are an atheist)! Abrahamic faith - Judaism, Islam and Christianity, do not believe in rebirth; this is a very big difference compared to Hinduism, which strongly believes in rebirth. Next important distinction is the role of karma; while this is the core tenant of Hinduism, so much so that even some atheists believe in universal principle of karma, a completely self-running system independent of deity, hence comes the term "[Hindu Atheism](en.wikipedia.org/wiki Aug 19 at 16:50
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From my experience of reading a fair amount of shāstras, a Hindu is defined as a person who

  • believes in the existence of an all-powerful, omnipresent, omnipotent, genderless, incomprehensible Supreme Being called Paramātman (whom the lay people commonly ascribe the English name of God) who is beyond limitations imposed by human description, is formless but can assume form at the same time
  • believes in the existence of the individual soul called jīvātman that leads a completely separate existence independent of the human body
  • believes in the law of karma
  • believes in the cycle of reincarnation
  • derives religious understanding from the Vaidika corpus of texts, any valid interpretation of the Vedanta philosophy, the Itihāsa texts, the Paurānika & Tāntrika corpus of literature
  • derives the understanding of society through the above-mentioned texts & the Smriti corpus of literature to some extent
  • believes that the ultimate goal of human life is to forge a close-relationship or identity of the jīvātman with respect to Paramātman over mundane matters of life

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