4

At which place in their commentaries do they mention about the sutras?

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Devata Kanda sutras are now lost but it looks like they were recently lost. They were quoted by commentators of Brahma Sutras and also some Purva Mimamsakas.

Adi Shankaracharya in his Brahma Sutra Bhashya quotes Sankarshana Kanda which is a part of Devata Kanda sutras to prove that deities are different.

In commentary to Third Adhyaya Third Pada sutra 43, प्रदानवदेव तदुक्तं (pradānavadeva taduktaṃ )

The section of the Vâgasaneyaka which begins, 'Voice held, I shall speak' (Bri. Up. I. 5, 21). determines Prâna to be the best among the organs of the body,....... the divinity is each time a different one according to the address, and from this it follows that the three offerings also are separate.--Thus, in the case under discussion, Vâyu and Prâna, although fundamentally non-different, are to be held apart as objects of meditation, and we have therefore to do with two separate meditations.--This is explained in the Saṅkarsha-kânda, 'The divinities are separate on account of their being cognized thus.'

The sutra quoted here is

नाना वा देवता प्रुथाग्ज्ञानात्

nānā vā devatā pruthāgjñānāt

Ramanujacharya also mentioned the Devata Kanda sutras in Sri Bhashya while commenting on the same sutra pradānavadeva taduktaṃ. He has also mentioned the same devata Kanda sutra quoted above along with other Chandogya Upanishad mantras.

Just as in the case of the offerings.....There is a text 'He is to offer a purodâsa on eleven potsherds to Indra the ruler, to Indra the supreme ruler, to Indra the self-ruler.' This injunction refers to one and the same Indra, possessing the qualities of rulership and so on; but as, through connexion with those several qualities, the aspects of Indra differ, the oblation of the purodâsa has to be repeated. This is declared in the Sânkarshana, 'The divinities are different on account of separation.'--Here terminates the adhikarana of 'offerings.'

Later acharyas Madhvacharya and Vedanta Desikan also mentioned the other four Devata Sutras in their works.

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Adi Shankaracharya, Ramanujacharya, and others quote a Sutra of the Devata Kanda Sutras in the course of proving that Prana and Vayu should be kept seperate in meditation. Here is what Adi Shankaracharya says in this section of his Brahma Sutra Bhashya:

With regard to the ishti comprising three sacrificial cakes, which is enjoined in the passage, Taitt. Samh. II, 3, 6, 'A purodâsa on eleven potsherds to Indra the ruler, to Indra the over-ruler, to Indra the self-ruler,' it might be supposed that the three cakes are to be offered together because they are offered to one and the same Indra, and because the concluding sentence says, 'conveying to all (gods) he cuts off to preclude purposelessness.' But as the attributes (viz. 'ruler' and so on) differ, and as scripture enjoins that the yâgyâ and anuvâkyâmantras are to exchange places with regard to the different cakes, the divinity is each time a different one according to the address, and from this it follows that the three offerings also are separate.--Thus, in the case under discussion, Vâyu and Prâna, although fundamentally non-different, are to be held apart as objects of meditation, and we have therefore to do with two separate meditations.--This is explained in the Saṅkarsha-kânda, 'The divinities are separate on account of their being cognized thus.'

And here is what Ramanujacharya says in this section of the Sri Bhashya:

There is a text 'He is to offer a purodâsa on eleven potsherds to Indra the ruler, to Indra the supreme ruler, to Indra the self-ruler.' This injunction refers to one and the same Indra, possessing the qualities of rulership and so on; but as, through connexion with those several qualities, the aspects of Indra differ, the oblation of the purodâsa has to be repeated. This is declared in the Sânkarshana, 'The divinities are different on account of separation.'

The Sutra quoted is "Na Na Va Devata Prithaktvat" or "They are different gods because they are cognized thus". What that means that offerings to Indra the king, Indra the overlord, and Indra the sovereign should be kept separate. This is a reference to the offerings enjoined in this chapter of the Taittiriya Samhita of the Yajur Veda:

Prajapati assigned food to the gods; he said, 'Whatever shall be left over these worlds, be that mine.' That was left over these worlds, Indra, the king, Indra, the overlord, Indra, the sovereign; thence he milked these worlds threefold; that is the cause of its having three elements. For him of whom he desires, 'May he be an eater of food', let him offer this (offering) of three elements, to Indra, the king, a cake on eleven potsherds, to Indra, the overlord, to Indra, the sovereign. Indra, the king, is this (world of earth), Indra, the overlord, is this (atmosphere), Indra, the sovereign, is yonder (world of heaven); verily he has recourse to these worlds with their own share; verily they bestow food on him; he becomes an eater of food. Even as one milks a cow ready to give milk by reason of its calf, so he milks these worlds, made ready, for desire, for food; he places (the cake) on potsherds face upwards, for variety. There are three cakes, these worlds are three; (verily they serve) to obtain these worlds; each one above the other is larger, for so as it were are these worlds; (verily they serve) for prosperity; he cuts off from all (the cakes) as he sets them up without making a failure; be recites (the verses) alternating, to prevent burning.

By the way, other Acharyas, including Madhvacharya, Vedanta Desikan, Sudarshana Suri, and Appayya Dikshitar quote other Sutras of the Devata Kanda Sutras. We know a total of five Sutras from the Devata Kanda Sutras:

  1. Athato Daivi Jijnasa - Now therefore there is a desire to know the gods
  2. Nana Va Devata Prithaktvat - They are different gods because they are cognized thus.
  3. Ante Harau Taddarshanat - Ultimately Hari is to be meditated upon
  4. Sa Vishnuraha Hi - He is called Vishnu
  5. Tam Brahmetyachakshate, Tam Brahmetyachakshate - He is announced as Brahman, he is announced as Brahman

The first Sutra came in the beginning, the second came somewhere in the middle, and the last three came at the end.

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