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I know that different Gods, or different manifestations of Ultimate Reality, are worshiped in different regions. Furthermore, there is a lot of linguistic diversity across Bhārat.

So, I'm wondering:

  • Is it difficult to practice a form of Sānātana Dharma that differs from the majority in a particular area?
    For example, there are many temples to Ganesha in Maharashtra. But, I think there are few in Uttar Pradesh. So, is it difficult for Ganesha devotees to practice in Uttar Pradesh?
  • If someone is devoted to a particular deity, should they try to live nearer a temple dedicated to that one?
  • Is it difficult to discuss philosophy & scriptures in a region which predominantly speaks a different language? For example, is it difficult for someone from Kashmir to discuss the Bhagavad Gita with someone in Tamil Nadu?

closed as too broad by Swami Vishwananda, Sarvabhouma, Suresh Ramaswamy, DirghaChintayanti, Triyugi Narayan Mani Apr 30 '18 at 5:12

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    again, you are asking different unrelated questions under one heading. edit your question to one question, and some are asking for opinions. – Swami Vishwananda Apr 29 '18 at 2:53
  • These are three parts to a single question: how much does region affect Hindu practice. This is already narrowing out other factors like, food, customs, dress. I only want to know how regionality affects practice. – Rubellite Yakṣī Apr 29 '18 at 2:59
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    @RubelliteFae There are some regional differences. For example, the Tamil Veda is very important to the Sri Vaishnava community, and so a non-Tamilian might have problems adopting Sri Vaishnvaism. So some scriptures in one particular language will attract followers in that region. And indeed, most Sri Vaishnavas live in Tamil Nadu and near Sri Vaishnava temples and Divya Desams. The Bhagavad Gita is followed universally across India, so the Kashmiri and Tamilian wont have problems discussing it if they speak a language they both understand. – Ikshvaku Apr 29 '18 at 3:22
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    1. Possibly. 2. Would be nice iIf they have the means and the opportunity 3. Philosophical discussions to this day happen in Sanskrit. Scholars sometimes traveled to seats of learning like Kasi and engage in debates/discussions. Sringeri Jagadguru conducts religious/philosophical conference/seminar annually and these happen in Sanskrit. – user1195 Apr 29 '18 at 17:53
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    Q: "Should one try to live in an area where their sect is popular?" Answer: nowhere there is any such restriction in shashtras nor said by any acharyas. – zaxebo1 May 6 '18 at 8:20

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