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In the Bhagvad, Lord Krishna is portrayed stealing butter and milk from the Gopis. He teased them, broke their dahi handis, etc.

Why did he do so?

Why are the acts of stealing and teasing women allowed for him but not for other men?

  • I think he didn't stole for himself always, he also used to distribute that amongst monkeys... – Mr. Alien Jun 21 '14 at 7:47
  • @Mr.Alien hehe, right. But, stealing is stealing. (I am not trying to file a case on him, I am just trying to clear my thinking.) – user3459110 Jun 21 '14 at 8:01
  • great question ! First, Krishna is God, not normal human. He did acts impossible for humans like lifting Govardhana hill. If you can lift the hill, then you can also steal butter. Second, there are saints who have devoted most of their lives to enjoying the fact that krishna stole butter and teased women and they've realized there is a deep philosophy hidden behind these acts, and it's definitely not like a normal man stealing or teasing. – ram May 4 '17 at 11:55
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In Bhagavata itself, this is explained.

According to Hindu philosophy, the aim of each human life is to attain or realize the Parabrahma or Paramathma.

The meaning of the relation between Lord Krishna and the Gopis represents the Paramathma and Jeevathma. This was most eternal and can not be compared with other devotees of Krishna.

Krishna wanted to give the Gopis a sign from his early childhood that he was about to steal their hearts. By engaging in stealing, the Gopis started to complain to Ma Yasodha about Krishna. He was actually making the Gopis think of him always. Since he did these things, the Gopis started to think about Krishna in each and every one of their actions. Since the Yadavas' life was associated with cattles, the simplest way to do this trick was to steal butter and milk. And by doing this, Lord Krishna prepared them for the Rasaleela. Thus, Paramathma (Krishna) and Jeevathmas (Gopis) showed that everything is the one and only ParaBrahma. Thus, Lord Krishna lead them to Moksha through eternal love and devotion.

Some of the information contained in this post requires additional references. Please edit to add citations to reliable sources that support the assertions made here. Unsourced material may be disputed or deleted.

  • Reference of 'Bhagawata" is too broad. Pl. cite the chapter, verses. – Vineet Nov 11 '18 at 10:01

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protected by Community Apr 19 '17 at 15:23

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