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Are gods or Hindu deities only forces of nature? Are they conscious of their existence?

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    When you become conscious of your own existence you become god! I am' itself is God. The seeking itself is God. In seeking you discover that you are neither the body nor the mind, and the love of the self in you is for the self in all. The two are one. The consciousness in you and the consciousness in me, apparently two, really one, seek unity and that is love. – Just_Do_It Jul 26 '18 at 15:23
  • Related subset: Did Rama know that he was Avatar of Lord Vishnu? – iammilind Jul 26 '18 at 15:36
  • @Just Nicely explained, but please consider adding answer instead. – TheLittleNaruto Jul 26 '18 at 17:46
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    @iammilind .. I think that answer you mentioned is not related. Because he is speaking of are the Gods self-conscious of their "existence". Like can they cognize, "I exist". Your link merely answers if Ram knew he was Vishnu while on earth. I think they are not the same. – user9072 Jul 27 '18 at 6:14
  • Yes, they are Jivas just like us. – Ikshvaku Sep 25 '18 at 2:49
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Like stated in my comment above When you become conscious of your own existence you become god!

Citing this from the lectures by Swami Vivekananda on “Raja Yoga”, it says:

According to the Sânkhya Philosophy there is no God. It says that there cannot be any God of this universe, because if there were He must be a Soul, and a Soul must be one of two things, either bound or free. How can the soul that is bound by nature, or controlled by nature, create? It is itself a slave. On the other hand, what business has the soul that is free to create and manipulate all these things? It has no desires, so cannot have any need to create. Secondly, it says the theory of God is an unnecessary one; nature explains all. What is the use of any God? But Kapila teaches that there are many souls, who, though nearly attaining perfection, fall short because they cannot perfectly renounce all powers. Their minds for a time merge in nature, to re‑emerge as its masters. Such gods there are. We shall all become such gods, and, according to the Sânkhyas, the God spoken of in the Vedas really means one of these free souls. Beyond them there is not an eternally free and blessed creator of the universe. On the other hand the Yogîs say, “Not so, there is a God; there is one Soul separate from all other souls, and He is the eternal Master of all creation, the Ever Free, the Teacher of all teachers.” The Yogîs admit that those the Sânkhyas call the merged in nature also exist. They are Yogîs who have fallen short of perfection, and though, for a time, debarred from attaining the goal, remain as rulers of parts of the universe. [source]

'I am' itself is God. The seeking itself is God. In seeking you discover that you are neither the body nor the mind, and the love of the self in you is for the self in all. The two are one. The consciousness in you and the consciousness in me, apparently two, really one, seek unity and that is love.

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