2

The great " Mystical Spirit Swan " known as Paramahansa is revered by Hindus, and is believed to be the vehicle to the promised land for the individuals Spirit. Is he composed of Swarupas ? If so what are they and where are these vibrations activated on Paramahansa ?

  • 2
    Your questions are mostly assumptions, not questions. They have no real basis and solid grounding. Paramhansa is not a swan, rather it is metaphorically representing one, as in a person has reached that stage. And you don't need to be a Paramhansa to be a siddha. Siddhis are activated merely by practicing fruitful yoga. – user9072 Aug 11 '18 at 2:03
  • 1
    And there is no Promised Land concept. Although you can say that the final destination Brahman is somewhat a promised land of sorts. – user9072 Aug 11 '18 at 2:04
5

Paramhamsa is actually the name of a class of ascetics.

Other classes are Kuticaka, Bahudaka, Hamsa etc. A Paramhamsa is considered as the one who have spiritually evolved the most among these classes.

Several references to them can be found in the minor Upanishads and other scriptures.

Here is one such reference from the Narada Parivrajaka Upanishad (which talks a lot about Sannyasis and Sannyasa):

"A bath is ordained three times a day for Kutlcakas, twice a day for Bahudakas, and once a day for Hamsas. A mental bath is ordained for Paramahamsas, a bath with ashes for Turiyatitas, and a wind bath for Avadhutas. A vertical mark on the forehead is ordained for Kutlcakas, a triple horizontal mark for Bahudakas, both a vertical and a triple horizontal mark for Hamsas [NpU 174, n. 58], the smearing with ashes for Paramahamsas, a spot with sandal paste for Turiyatitas, but none at all for Avadhutas. Kutlcakas are required to shave every season, and Bahudakas every other season.100 [204] Hamsas and Paramahamsas are not required to shave, but if they do, they shave every six months.101 Turiyatitas and Avadhutas do not shave at all. "Kutlcakas may eat a full meal given by one person. Bahudakas beg their food in the manner of a bee [NpU 174, n. 57]. Hamsas and Paramahamsas use their hands as begging bowls, while Turiyatitas use their mouths like cows and Avadhutas obtain their food in the manner of a python [NpU 175, nn. 61-62]. "Two garments are prescribed for Kutlcakas, a single garment for Bahudakas, and a rag for Hamsas. Paramahamsas may go naked or wear a single loincloth. Turiyatitas and Avadhutas are clad as they were at birth. An antelope skin is prescribed for Hamsas and Paramahamsas, but not for others. "Divine worship is ordained for Kutlcakas and Bahudakas, mental worship for Hamsas and Paramahamsas, [205] and the so'ham meditation [NpU 191, n. 87] for Turiyatitas and Avadhutas. Kutlcakas and Bahudakas are qualified to mutter mantras, while Hamsas and Paramahamsas are qualified to meditate. The qualification of Turiyatltas and Avadhutas, however, does not extend to anything that involves another.102 Turiyatitas and Avadhutas, as well as Paramahamsas, are qualified to teach the Great Sayings

Yet another reference from another minor Upanishad called the Bhikshuka Upanishad:

[233] There are four types of mendicants who aspire to liberation: Kuticakas, Bahudakas, Hamsas, and Paramahamsas [AsU 100, n. 8]. Kuticakas are people such as Gautama, Bharadvaja, Yajnavalkya, and Vasistha, who, eating eight mouthfuls,1 seek only liberation by the yogic path. [234] Bahudakas are those who carry a triple staff and a water pot; who wear a topknot, a sacrificial string, and an ochre garment; -who, avoiding honey and meat, beg eight mouthfuls of food from the house of a Brahmin seer; and who seek only liberation by the yogic path. Hamsas are those who do not stay more than one night in a village, five nights in a town, and seven nights in a sacred place; who consume cow's urine and dung;2 who are always given to the lunar fast [AsU 101, n. 9]; and who seek only liberation by the yogic path. Paramahamsas3 are [235] men such as Samvartaka, Aruni, Svetaketu, Jadabharata, Dattatreya, Suka, Vamadeva, and Haritaka, who, eating eight mouthfuls, seek only liberation by the yogic path. They live at the foot of trees, or in deserted houses, or in cemeteries. They either wear a garment or go naked.

And, no there is no swan that will take one to "that land" :). It's not that easy and there's no shortcut.

But, Hamsa and Paramahamsa both these words are also used to refer to the supreme self (Paramatama). Refer to the the Hamsa Mantra for example.

EDIT

I'm responding to your following comment:

WHAT no swan, the most elegant of birds that I am the tail of does not exist, now Rickross you are messing with my brain . Hehehe. Maha Hamsa who is the accumulated whole of all Jivatmans, the vahana of Saraswati and Brahma, depicted in millions of paintings, pictures and sculptures, are you really saying that Hamsa is not real ? What to believe who to believe.

You are right with couple of things you have said here. Swan is indeed considered as the best among birds. In scriptures we find a lot of verses saying " Just like Ganga is among rivers, cow among all animals, swan among the birds, ... ".

And, it is also true that Lord Brahma's mount is a swan.

One of the Gayatri Mantras for Lord Brahma is the following:

Om chaturmukhaye vidmahe hamsarudhaye dhimahi tanno brahma prachodayath ||

Here, the word Hamsarudhaye means the one who rides on the Hamsa or a swan.

But, in scriptures, when we find the word Paramhamsa it mostly refers to a particular kind of ascetic as already mentioned above.

Sometimes, the word can also refer to the Supreme Self (Paramatma). For e.g. in case of the Hamsa Mantra.

One Gayatri Mantra for Parambrahma is the following:

Om hamsa hamsaya vidmahe param hamsaya dhimahi tanno hamsa prachodayath ||

So, here Hamsa, Paramhamsa are referring to the Supreme Self.

So, you are not absolutely wrong but that idea about the swan is not entirely correct too. :)

  • WHAT no swan, the most elegant of birds that I am the tail of does not exist, now Rickross you are messing with my brain . Hehehe. Maha Hamsa who is the accumulated whole of all Jivatmans, the vahana of Saraswati and Brahma, depicted in millions of paintings, pictures and sculptures, are you really saying that Hamsa is not real ? What to believe who to believe. – Frank Hestermann Aug 12 '18 at 1:48
  • Yes Hamsa is the vahana of Brahma alright but the Paramhamsa term is not at all used to denote that bird. It is used to denote a group of Sannyasi. It can also refer to the highest self. I will update the answer regarding this. @FrankHestermann – Rickross Aug 12 '18 at 4:55
  • @FrankHestermann see my revised answer. – Rickross Aug 12 '18 at 12:05
  • @FrankHestermann That swan u are talking about belongs to Lord Brahma, only he will ride it we can't :D – Rickross Aug 12 '18 at 12:31
  • your research is great, is there anything out there about the Swarupas - parts of the Hamsa and the jnanas of the siddhis ? – Frank Hestermann Aug 12 '18 at 13:23

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .