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I watch 2 videos on YouTube:

One video showing lots of the benefits of drinking Gomutra (Link 1),

In the second video, Showing Gomutra should not be drinking (Link 2).

My Question:

  • Should the person drink Gomutra?
  • What is the significance of Gomutra?

What do our Hinduism say about this belief? What is the significance of this?

marked as duplicate by sv., Akshay S, Sarvabhouma, The Destroyer Oct 12 '18 at 4:51

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    It varies from person to person and depends upon his/her body type, for instance not everyone can drink milk, wine etc. Try it if you want to and see if it suits your body. – Just_Do_It Oct 11 '18 at 15:30
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    "Should Gomutra drink the person?" I think you mean the other way. :D. The belief part and suggesting to drink gomutra is already covered in the following question Any other slokas suggesting drinking of cow urine – Sarvabhouma Oct 11 '18 at 16:18
  • Following the discussion in this blog post might help. Don't start drinking Go-mutra or Go-arka (distilled cow urine) as a 'medicine' without your doctor's advice. – sv. Oct 11 '18 at 18:16
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Urine (mūtra), as well as Cow's urine (gomūtra), is seen as a medicine in the science of Ayurveda.

I have found the following quote by Dr. Asit K. Panja in his thesis called “A review Of jāṅgama dravyas (animal products)”:

Animal urine is considered an important substance of medicinal value and is mentioned in almost all Āyurvedic texts. The urine of eight animals has been mentioned in the scientific use for various diseases in the Āyurvedic classics.

He quotes the text Siddhabheṣajamaṇimālā (a late Ayurvedic treatise written by Kṛṣṇarāma) and shows the properties and medicinal uses of Cow's urine:

Gomūtra (cow urine) has kaṭu, tikta, uṣṇa, tīkṣṇa, kṣāra, laghu, agnidīpaka, medhya, pittavikāra, vāta-kaphahara properties and is used in gulma, udara, ānāha, kaṇḍu, śūla, mukha, netravikāra, kāsa, śvāsa, ugrakuṣṭha, krimipīḍā, plīhā, vibandha, pāṇḍu, pāma, āmavāta, śotha roga (2/276), pāṇḍu roga (4/pāṇḍu /13), udāvarta cikitsā (4/udāvarta/5) and svarabheda (4/svarabheda/3). It is also mentioned as rucikara, sandhānakara (2/197).

Besides the various medicinal uses mentioned above, it is also said that cow's urine is useful in the purification of mercury:

Apart from medicinal uses, it is also used in pārada śodhana (5/12).

As for whether you should drink, "fresh from the bottle", I don't really know...

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There is a tradition to consume "Pancha Gavya" or "Panch Amruta" consisting of 5 substances out of cow ----- gomutra (urine), gomaya (dung), milk, curd, honey.

Although I don't know scriptual references, I have seen so many people consuming Gomutra without any harm.

Let me share a concrete experience.
I have seen a person who used to drink country alcohol very very heavily for so many years. After some years, he stopped drinking alcohol and consumed fresh Gomutra regularly. He lived a long & healthy life, with healthy liver. So in my experience, one should consume Gomutra (under the advise of Ayurvedic doctor).

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    Personal experiences are not considered sources. Also, giving advises which affect health too. In such cases, they should be said to see an expert in it. See How much of Ayurveda is accepted here? – Sarvabhouma Oct 12 '18 at 4:43
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    @Sarvabhouma As you rightly said, I had already mentioned a word of caution in the end (under the advise of Ayurvedic doctor). Secondly, I respectfully differ from you regarding "Personal experiences are not considered sources". In fact, "experience" is much much more valuable than just "bookish" knowledge. I don't undermine books, but we should not undermine experience too. – Vineet Oct 12 '18 at 4:46
  • Personal experiences are not verifiable. That is the reason they are not considered valid references. It is stated in the faq hinduism.meta.stackexchange.com/q/266/5212 I have many instances where Ayurveda failed for treatment. So, whose experience should be considered now? – Sarvabhouma Oct 12 '18 at 5:29
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    @Vineet you should either cite some source or reliable research article on Ayurved at least. – Pandya Oct 12 '18 at 8:27

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