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According to Advaita, does the person become Krishna once he attains moksha?

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    anyways I am not expert in Advaita. let those who know advaita very well answer. As for as I know, neither Krishna nor you exist separately, all are one. Everything is Brahman. Hence, there is no becoming Krishna. – user16618 Nov 27 '18 at 13:30
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    It has Moksha but what they are saying is you are already liberated. Due to Maya you are identifying yourselves with physicality ! – Parabrahman Jyoti Nov 27 '18 at 14:13
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    Close voter, I have a hard understanding why/how this is personal advice. – Sarvabhouma Nov 28 '18 at 6:12
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    Close Voters give a valid reason for your vote!!! Seriously Voting is going unfair – Parabrahman Jyoti Nov 28 '18 at 6:38
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    It's crazy, what is it in this question to vote for closing? – user16618 Nov 28 '18 at 6:46
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https://www.advaita-vedanta.org/avhp/ad_faq.html

The essential identity of the Atman and brahman is the most important tenet of advaita. brahman is the substratum on which all phenomena are experienced, and also the antaryAmin, the One Lord who dwells in all beings. The innermost Atman, the real Self, is the same as this antaryAmin, and identical to brahman. Liberation (moksha) consists in realizing this identity, not just as a matter of literal or intellectual understanding, but as something that is to be grasped by the individual in his/her own personal experience.

According to advaita, technically, there is no person or Krishna. So, given that everything is Brahman and moksha is just realizing this oneness, there is no question of a person becoming Krishna, because they are unreal in the first place. The interpretation of the qualifier "unreal" is of course out of scope of this question.

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Impossible to become Krishna in Advaita Vedanta or any Vedanta.

In Advaita Moksha, the transformation of the jiva happens to Nirguna Brahman and it is Saguna Brahman who does the transformation. The question of becoming Saguna Brahman (which maps to Krishna in Advaita) is an impossibility not only from the view of Brahma Sutras, furthermore there is no Acharya or scripture that has propounded such a view. Nirguna Brahman is simply the jivatma without any covering of mind or matter i.e. pure self.

From Kanchi Paramacharya's discourses, this is the finale of Advaita Sadhana

Mark it! There is a difference! The One who does the transformation here is the Ishvara who is the saguNa-brahman. But the transformation he does to the JIvAtmA is the formless nirguNa-brahman! And the Jiva does the dhyAna only to become nirguNa and not for becoming the saguNa Ishvara!

  • How does saguna brahman help one to realize he is nirguna brahman? – user16618 Nov 27 '18 at 14:31
  • As per Adi Shankaracharya's Brahma Sutra Bhashya and other Bhashyas the realization of the jiva's true nature can only occur by Ishwara's grace. He removes the covering of Avidya. Its similar to the VAishnavite schools where God's grace is necessary for liberation. Paramacharya was a spiritual giant of India who revived Vedas, Dharma and firm faith in scriptures.Having said this, there are other works in Advaita which are not so theistic in nature. – subash rajaa Nov 27 '18 at 14:37
  • can you please point out which in brahma sutra Shankaracharya says this? – user16618 Nov 27 '18 at 14:48
  • It is there is Brahma Sutra Bhashya. Again quoting from Paramacharya's discourses where he quotes the Bhashya for 3-2-5 with Sanskrit words " na svabhAvata eva sarveshhAM jantUnAM -- ‘Revelation’ does not happen naturally for everybody. Ishvara-prasAdAt samsiddhasya kasyacit eva Avirbhavati -- ‘By God’s Grace It reveals only to that rare person who has the highest achievement’. " – subash rajaa Nov 27 '18 at 15:00
  • Another reference is in : तदनुग्रहहेतुकेनैव च ज्ञानेन मोक्षसिद्धिर्भवितुमर्हति . It is by the Jnana that ensues owing to the grace of Ishwara alone that the accomplishment of moksha comes about. [ Brahma sutra bhashya: 2.3.16.41] – subash rajaa Nov 27 '18 at 15:38

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