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I have been chanting Hanuman Chalisa since childhood, but what makes me wonder is that, why there is the verse -

buddhi heen tanu janike sumirahu pawankumar,
bal buddhi vidhya deu mohi harhu kalesh vikar

बुद्धिहीन तनु जानिके सुमिरौं पवन-कुमार ।
बल बुधि बिद्या देहु मोहिं हरहु कलेस बिकार ॥

Isn't that offensive for lord Hanuman?

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I think you're just misinterpreting the line. Tulasidas isn't calling Hanuman "buddhihina" or lacking in intelligence, he's calling himself buddhihina and thus in need of Hanuman's help. Here is how the Gitapress translation renders the line:

Considering myself devoid of intellectual merits, I invoke Sri Hanuman, the son of wind-god. O! Bestow on me the strength, intellect and knowledge. Kindly remove my bodily ailments and mental maladies.

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As pointed out by Keshav, you are misinterpreting the meaning. I'd like to add by putting these lines into context. These two lines are the 3rd and 4th lines of the Doha with which the [Hanuman Chalisa][1] begins. The full doha is -

[1] Shri Guru Charan Saroja-Raj Nija Manu Mukuru Sudhaari [2] Baranau Rahubhara Bimala Jasu Jo Dayaku Phala Chari [3] Budhee-Heen Tanu Jaanikay Sumirau Pavana Kumar [4] Bala-Budhee Bidya Dehoo Mohee Harahu Kalesa Vikaar

The meaning of these four lines is as follows. [1] Using the dust from the Lotus-like feet of the divine Guru, I clean my mirror-like mind, [2] And describe the pure glory of Lord Rama of the Raghu dynasty – the allocator of the four types of outcomes – Dharma (Righteousness), Artha(Material wealth), Kama(Pleasure) and Moksha (Freedom from rebirth), [3] Recognizing my ignorance, I remember you oh Lord Hanuman – the Son of Pavan (the God of Wind), [4] Please bless me with strength, knowledge and wisdom and cure me of any diseases and scars.

What Tulsidas is doing here is saying that he is not knowledgeable enough to pray to Lord Rama who is an incarnation of Lord Vishnu the supreme deity. However, as described in other parts of the Chalisa, Lord Hanuman is most knowledgeable when it comes to serving and praying to Lord Rama. In addition, a prayer to Lord Hanuman is believed to please Lord Rama Himself. In this context, Tulsidas asks Lord Hanuman to bless him with knowledge so his prayers may also reach Lord Rama.

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I can see where your confusion is. Regrettably most translations get the contextual meaning correct that we are asking for courage strength, but not many get the translation.

You are confused by "tanu" which roughly translates to "you" (I was confused by this as well, but did a little research). Most people forget that "Tanu"= you in modern day haryanvi, or punjabi, while the chalisa has sanskrit words in it. so if you take the sanskrit translation of "tanu" the entire phrase will come together. Tanu in sanskrit = Delicate, weak, slender or emaciated body. Once you plug in that meaning, the translation becomes:

Consider this weak body devoid of intellectual merits, I invoke Sri Hanuman, the son of wind-god. O! Bestow on me the strength, intellect and knowledge. Kindly remove my bodily ailments and mental maladies.

So now it makes sense. the singer's body is weak as well as devoid of intelligence, hence not only give me intelligence, but physical strengths as well.

Hope this helps.

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