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Our bagavad gita says to not have interest on material world, it talked about kama, krodha, lobha, etc and get rid of them as they cause sorrow in one's life.

It says

One should not have desires, which causes angry, that causes greed, with that people do bad things, which will create sorrow

(correct me if I am wrong )

But recently, Abdul Kalam ( India's former president) said this

You have to dream before your dreams can come true.

And most of our hindus supported it.

Are they both not conflicts. If yes, I assume most of the hindus forgot what their religion says? or is there any reason to support this new idea?

closed as primarily opinion-based by Swami Vishwananda, DirghaChintayanti, sv., Bhavin Patel, Parabrahman Jyoti May 18 at 15:53

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    who is abdul kalam? and exactly according to Who says 'most of our hindus support it'? – Swami Vishwananda May 13 at 7:05
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I think your question is a little misguided, you are trying to mix up two entirely different things.

The words of Bhagavad-gita comes directly from Lord Krishna for the betterment of humanity as a whole, and it represents the beliefs of Hindu culture,

while the words of Abdul Kalam comes from an individual (He is a great person, no doubt, but he still is an individual human), that talks about the aspiration of an individual. Though there is nothing wrong with having such thoughts, you cannot compare these two.

I assume most of the Hindus forgot what their religion says?

No, they did not, I think most of them know what their religion says, but people mostly align themselves to the thoughts that they see fit as per their current environment.

And people may support any new idea that seems interesting enough to them but only those who follow that idea can make a difference in their lives (This holds true for teachings of both Gita and Kalam)

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What Abdul Kalam said was completely correct, and so are our scriptures.

You are comparing apples to nails. When we want to achieve something, we need to have a desire for it. We need to know it. That is what his statement means. Even a person who wants Moksha, needs to have a desire for it (Although, we must leave all desires, including that of moksha eventually), or we would not be able to do it. Also, if Hindus forgot their scriptures while agreeing with Abdul Kalam is irrelevant, as most Hindus do not aspire for Moksha.

Some of the information contained in this post requires additional references. Please edit to add citations to reliable sources that support the assertions made here. Unsourced material may be disputed or deleted.

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