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Sanatana Dharma originated in India. India also has another name: "Bharata/Bharathavarsha". The term ArshaBharata culture is commonly used for pointing out the Sanatana Dharma in South India. How did the nation get this name?

  • what is ArhsaBharatha? – Vineet Menon Jun 22 '14 at 6:48
  • South, I'm from South. Never heard this term? Is it Tamil? – Vineet Menon Jun 22 '14 at 11:42
  • Malayalam,Kerala, I thought the term is used in other states too, that caused the confusion, – user11 Jun 22 '14 at 11:52
  • what? I'm mallu expat. Never heard. Anyways I'm not so good with Malayalam. – Vineet Menon Jun 22 '14 at 12:18
  • @VineetMenon:Arsha means ഋഷിയെ സംബന്ധിച്ച(related to rishis),sorry for the confusion...Mainly wanted to emphasize on the term Bharatha. The term arhsabharatha is widely used in Malayalam anyway. – user11 Jun 22 '14 at 15:37
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After the name of an ancient king Bharata, India is also known as Bharata-varṣa since the prehistoric times. Before it, this land was called as Ajanābha-varṣa. This is stated in Shrimad Bhagavatam:

ajanābhaṁ nāmaitad varṣaṁ bhāratam iti yata ārabhya vyapadiśanti. [SB - 5.7.3]

Meaning
The name of this land was Ajanabha. It came to be known as Bharata after starting of his (King Bharata) reign.

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    And King Bharat was son of Shakuntala and Dushyant and grandson of Brahmarishi Vishwamitra. – doptimusprime Jun 22 '14 at 9:08
  • @dbasic: In Bhagavata, there is story about a deer and Bharatha/Jadabharatha. Are both these Bharathas same? – user11 Jun 22 '14 at 12:05
  • @ArunningMind: I have read that story in Wikipedia (not before that). It looks different. – doptimusprime Jun 22 '14 at 12:51
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    @ArunningMind yes, both are same but different incarnations. King Bharat after retiring to the order of sannyasa towards the end of his life got fond of a deer that he had rescued from water. As he died thinking of the deer, in the next birth he had to become a deer. Then after the end of that birth he again took birth as a human and became a paramahansa. So he came to be known as Jadabharata. – Be Happy Jun 22 '14 at 14:55
  • @jabahar I have not read anywhere that these two are same but different incarnations. Is there any quotations from the Veda stating the same? As far as I know, these two are different beings. Jadabharata in his latest and perhaps the last incarnation was recognized in the Swaminarayan sampradaya as Nishkulanand Swami (1766–1848). – Kapil Vyas Jun 26 '14 at 4:01

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