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Grihasthashram or Marriage is the joining of not just 2 souls - man and woman, but their two families as well.

When there is a difference of opinion between the 2 in-laws, how do shastras recommend the deadlock be broken ?

Is the law different for the husband and the wife ?

  • When man become grihastha, then he has to listen of himself and his wife. Parent can give advice bot not order after his marriage. This is rule set by Lord Brahma, This is the reason Brahma couldn't stop Daksha for insulting Shiva in his yagya. This is what I heard (onlyl heard) – Vishvam Nov 20 '19 at 5:45
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    Select that advice which suits you more without partiality. If even stranger is giving you better advice than your relatives then you should take it. Not accepting advice is not anything like insult of elders. Besides, Brahma couldn't stop coz he couldn't give order to stop his act, he can only advice that he should not do such. But Daksha refused advice. Giving order to son (who has got grihastha) regarding his grihastha life is like interfering in son's life which is not appropriate. – Vishvam Nov 20 '19 at 6:45
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    I don't think Hindu marriages are a joining of two families. People say that nowadays, but in reality the wife belongs to the husbands family after marriage. That's why it's called "kanyadaana", offering of daughter to another family. And in many cases, the wife's old family no longer has contact with her anymore. Generally the real parents of the wife don't interfere in their daughter's husband's family. – Ikshvaku Nov 20 '19 at 11:54
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    @Ikshvaku, "I don't think Hindu marriages are a joining of two families" - when the wife has a brother, the mama relation is very strong, in many cases, the mama's son may even marry the husband's daughter. "but in reality the wife belongs to the husbands family" , "And in many cases, the wife's old family no longer has contact with her anymore", "Generally the real parents of the wife don't interfere in their daughter's husband's family" - I don't think you know what 'reality' means :) you probably talking about what SHOULD happen.. and not what happens, at least in 21st century – ram Nov 20 '19 at 23:12
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    @ram: The scriptures/literature of Hinduism are definitely written on the concept of what should be the ideal situation?. However, they also refer to the cases of humans (man and woman) with avarice/ego/burning with revenge, etc. As far as I know, those cannot be applied completely to the present generation. In Ramayana, for example, King Janaka says, at the time of marriage of Sita, to Sri Rama that Sita will always be abiding him like his own shadow - पतिव्रता महभागा छायेवानुगता सदा . Can we expect this attitude now-a-days from the bride and in-laws? – srimannarayana k v Nov 21 '19 at 3:37

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