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I'm looking for the evidence slokas that devatas are the agents who control the universe.

  • you can ask back them are they accepting omnipresence of lord and omnicisent.. Then ask them God is in this idol or not.. They will say no its only idol (hirankashypu) Then tell them that they wait till Narasimha comes out of stone. Its simiple logic.. Lets have this premise – Prasanna R Oct 24 at 11:17
  • Premises 1. God is Omniscient and Omnirpresent Null hypothese Yes Then they that God is present in this idol also. (If christian denyes that) Then christian themselves contradicts God is Omniscient and Omnipresent. Then there God is Limited means there is not ultimate one who is present every where. Because they themselves deny the omnipresent..By default Hindu God is omnipresent both in theory and practice.. but christian god is not means there God is limited in capability then their GOd is not GOD – Prasanna R Oct 24 at 11:22
  • @SeverusSnape what you mean by secular if secular involves atheist how can they be called hindus how they can answer anyof the question because there answers have athestic interpretation in everything... If you say secular and include atheist than i would im not secular.. Why hinduism is only secular according to you. Why not muslims and christians? so Dont confuse the interpreation of your secularism with hinduism.. – Prasanna R Oct 24 at 14:46
  • The question is valid as far as the OP intention is not malign hinduism way of worship.. I believe @SeverusSnape you removing the content have OP question is meaning less.. – Prasanna R Oct 24 at 14:49
  • I'm sorry to make trouble to the people to read my question. I thought this site was for the people who seek truth from Veda. – Radhikadasi Oct 25 at 4:23
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The Brihadaranyaka Upanishad outlines this in Chapter 3, Section 9, which consists of 28 verses. The complete chapter can be read here - https://www.wisdomlib.org/hinduism/book/the-brihadaranyaka-upanishad/d/doc118360.html The first 9 verses are the essential verses...:

  1. Then Vidagdha, the son of Śakala, asked him. ‘How many gods are there, Yājñavalkya?’ Yājñavalkya decided it through this (group of Mantras known as) Nivid (saying), ‘As many as are indicated in the Nivid of the Viśvadevas—three hundred and three, and three thousand and three.’ ‘Very well,’ said Śākalya, ‘how many gods are there, Yājñavalkya?’ ‘Thirty-three.’ ‘Very well,’ said the other, ‘how many gods are there, Yājñavalkya?’ ‘Six.’ ‘Very well’ said Śākalya, ‘how many gods are there, Yājñavalkya?’ ‘Three.’ ‘Very well,’ said the other, ‘how many gods are there, Yājñavalkya?’ ‘Two.’ ‘Very well,’ said Śākalya, ‘how many gods are there, Yājñavalkya?’ ‘One and a half.’ ‘Very well,’ said the other, ‘how many gods are there, Yājñavalkya?’ ‘One.’ ‘Very well,’ said Śākalya, ‘which are those three hundred and three and three thousand and three?’

[translator's commentary] Then Vidagdha, the son of Śakala, asked him, ‘How many gods are there, Yājñavalkya?’ Yājñavalkya decided the number asked for by Śākalya through this Nivid that is just going to be mentioned. ‘As many gods as are indicated in the Nivid of the eulogistic hymn on the Viśvadevas.’ The Nivid is a group of verses giving the number of the gods, which are recited in the eulogistic hymn on the Viśvadevas. ‘There are as many gods as are mentioned in that Nivid.’ Which is that Nivid? The words of that Nivid are quoted: ‘Three hundred and three gods, and again three thousand and three gods. So many gods are there.’ ‘Very well,’ said Śākalya, ‘you know their intermediate number correctly.’ He next asks the smaller number of these very gods, ‘How many gods are there, Yājñavalkya?’ (Yājñavalkya answers one by one:) Thirty-three, six, three, two, one and a half, and one. After asking the larger and the smaller number of the gods, he now asks about their identity, ‘Which are those three hundred and three, and three thousand and three?’

  1. Yājñavalkya said, ‘These are but the manifestations of them, but there are only thirty-three gods.’ ‘Which are those thirty-three?’ ‘The eight Vasus, the eleven Rudras and the twelve Ādityas—these are thirty-one, and Indra and Prajāpati make up the thirty-three.’

[Commentary] Yājñavalkya said, ‘These, the three hundred and three etc., are but the manifestations of them, the thirty-three gods. But really there are only thirty-three gods.’ ‘Which are those thirty-three?’ The reply is being given: ‘The eight Vasus, the eleven Rudras and the twelve Ādityas—these are thirty-one, and Indra and Prajāpati make up the thirty-three.’

  1. ‘Which are the Vasus?’ ‘Fire, the earth, the air, the sky, the sun, heaven, the moon and the stars—these are the Vasus, for in these all this is placed; therefore they are called Vasus.’

[commentary] ‘Which are the Vasus?’ The identity of each group of the gods is being asked. ‘Fire, the earth,’ etc.—from fire up to the stars are the Vasus. Transforming themselves into the bodies and organs of all beings, which serve as the support for their work and its fruition, as also into their dwelling-places, these gods help every being to live, and they themselves live too. Because they help others to live, therefore they are called Vasus.

  1. ‘Which are the Rudras?’ ‘The ten organs in the human body, with the mind as the eleventh. When they depart from this mortal body, they make (one’s relatives) weep. Because they then make them weep, therefore they are called Rudras,’

[commentary] ‘Which are the Rudras?’ ‘ten sensory and motor organs in the human body, with the mind as the eleventh. When they, these organs; depart from this mortal body, after a person has completely experienced the results of his past work, they make his relatives weep. Because they then make them weep (Rud), therefore they are called Rudras.’

  1. ‘Which are the Ādityas?’ ‘The twelve months (are parts) of a year; these are the Ādityas, for they go taking all this with them. Because they go taking all this with them, there-fore they are called Ādityas.’

[commentary] ‘Which are the Ādityas?’ ‘It is well known that the twelve months are parts of a year; these are the Ādityas. How? For as they rotate they go taking a person’s longevity and the results of his work with them. Because they go taking (Ādā) all this with them, therefore they are called Ādityas.’

  1. ‘Which is Indra, and which is Prajāpati?’ ‘The cloud is Indra, and the sacrifice is Prajāpati.’ ‘Which is the cloud?’ ‘Thunder (strength).’ ‘Which is the sacrifice?’ ‘Animals.’

[commentary] ‘Which is Indra, and which is Prajāpati?’ ‘The cloud is Indra, and the sacrīfice is Prajāpati.’ ‘Which is the cloud?’ ‘Thunder,’ i.e. vigour or strength, which kills others; that is Indra, for it is his function. ‘Which is the sacrīfice?’ ‘Animals,’ for they are the means of a sacrifice. Because a sacrifice has no form of its own and depends on its means, the animals, therefore they are called sacrifice.

  1. ‘Which axe the six (gods)?’ ‘Fire, the earth, the air the sky, the sun and heaven— these are the six. Because all those (gods) are (comprised in) these six.’

[commentary] ‘Which are the six (gods)?’ The same gods, fire and the rest, that are classed as Vasus, leaving out the moon and the stars, become six in number. 'Because all those (thirty-three and other gods) that have been spoken of are these six.’ In other words, the Vasus and others that have been enumerated as details are included in these six.

  1. ‘Which are the three gods?’ ‘These three worlds, because in these all those gods are comprised.’ ‘Which are the two gods?’ ‘Matter and the vital force.[1]’ ‘Which are the one and a half?’ ‘This (air) that blows.’

[commentary] ‘Which are the three gods?’ ‘These three worlds.’ The earth and ñre taken together make one god, the sky and air make another, and heaven and the sun make a third; these are the three gods. Because in these three gods all the gods are comprised, therefore these are the three gods; this is the view of a certain section of philologists. ‘Which are the two gods?’ ‘Matter and the vital force’—these are the two gods; that is to say, these include all the gods that have been enumerated. ‘Which are the one and a half?’ ‘This air that blows.’

  1. ‘Regarding this some say, “Since the air blows as one substance, how can it be one and a half?” It is one and a half because through its presence all this attains surpassing glory.’ ‘Which is the one god?’ ‘The vital force (Hiraṇyagarbha); it is Brahman, which is called Tyat (that).’

[commentary] ‘Regarding this some say in objection, “the air blows as one substance, how can it be one and a half?” It is one and a half because through its presence all this attains surpassing glory.’ ‘Which is the one god?’ ‘The vital force it, the vital force, is Brahman, for it is vast, being the sum total of all the gods. And this Brahman is called Tyat (that),’ which is a word denoting remoteness. Thus the gods are one as well as many. The infinite number of gods are included in the limited number mentioned in the Nivid; these again are included in the successive (smaller) numbers, thirty-three and so on, up to the one vital force. It is this one vital force which expands into all those numbers up to the infinite. Thus the vital force alone is one and infinite as well as possessed of the intermediate numbers. That this one god, the vital force, has different names, forms, activities, attributes and powers is due to individual differences of qualification.

Thus, the 33 millions of devatas are all Brahman.

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  • Dear Swami Vishwananda, thank you for your merciful explanation. I wondered how many devatas in the universe. Your answer solved this. But I'm looking for one siloka which explains the devata's roles for sustaining the whole universe for non-believer of the existence of devatas in the universe. – Radhikadasi Oct 29 at 5:34

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