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Abrahamics (Christians, Muslims, Jews, etc.) worship God. God is the supreme Brahman. According to Vaishnavism, Vishnu is God (Brahman).

According to Sri Vaishnavism, a "Bhagavata" or "Vaishnava" is one who worships Bhagavan/Vishnu.

So, does this mean Abrahamics are Vaishnavas?

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    So, does this mean Abrahamics are Vaishnavas? - It's clearly answerable by deriving conclusions/inferences from scriptures yet closed as opinion based. Jan 15 '21 at 6:01
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    I didn't get how this question is specific to Abrahmic religion and Vaishnavism becuse Every religion believes in God and every sect of Hinduism worship particular form of God. So, the current logic of the question looks like a randomly chosen one?
    – Pandya
    Jan 20 '21 at 15:43
  • if abhramic reiligion believes in vishnu than they are vaishnavas otherwise they are not.. (Vishnu) vishathi iti anuhu (all prevading) omni presence. But muslims wont accept all prevading.. but even christain in theory say that all prevading.. but dont agree in practice.. because they deny existence of lord iin animals, they are created by by god for consumption.. but they dont have god in them so No they cannot be called Vaishnavas for sure
    – Prasanna R
    Mar 5 '21 at 14:59
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God might not be equivalent to Brahman (or Vishnu) because it can't be ascertained if the given God being worshipped is the supreme reality or some devata worthy of worship. There is a Buddhist Tantra Kaalchakra which doesn't equate Islamic God to be the ultimate reality or any of traditional devatas. It claims their God to be some inferior being from lower heaven which they would presume as God.

Therefore the statement

Abrahamics (Christians, Muslims, Jews, etc.) worship God.

is subjective & can't be ascertained if they are really worshipping any true devata or the ultimate reality. They don't have any concept of praana pratishtha also, so it further invites the possibility of them worshipping some other entity than the Brahman.

But having said that, I would like to throw light on a specific verse of Bhagwat Geeta,

BG 12.3-4: But those who worship the formless aspect of the Absolute Truth—the imperishable, the indefinable, the unmanifest, the all-pervading, the unthinkable, the unchanging, the eternal, and the immoveable—by restraining their senses and being even-minded everywhere, such persons, engaged in the welfare of all beings, also attain Me.

It shows that if someone is worshipping an entity with upaadhis like the imperishable, the indefinable, the unmanifest, the all-pervading, the unthinkable, the unchanging, the eternal, and the immoveable, then they are likely to worship the same Brahman. (Almost all Islamic schools don't believe in omnipresence/all-pervading of Allah).

But...

...being even-minded everywhere, such persons, engaged in the welfare of all beings...

even if they worship the same Brahman (or Vishnu) they must have understanding of dharma (welfare of all beings) attested by practice of yoga (by restraining their senses and even-minded everywhere) to attain to Brahman (or Vishnu) as it's indicated by the excerpt in the aforementioned verse,

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    Though I voted as opinion based to close the question. Yet the answer is really nice +1. :)
    – Adiyarkku
    Jan 15 '21 at 6:44

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