1

It is far from a known event that Seetha was not born to a mother, rather was unearthed when the king Janak was ploughing the earth.

In my understanding the ploughing is associated with farmers and why the king was on to that action?

3

Janaka was not ploughing for farming purposes, he was doing the ceremonial ploughing performed in the beginning of a Yagna, as described in this chapter of the Bala Kanda of the Ramayana:

Later, when I was ploughing the ritual field then raised by the plough [from the furrow is a baby girl... since she is] gained while consecrating the ritual-field, she is named as Seetha, and thus she is renowned. Hers is a non-uterine birth as she surfaced from the surface of the earth, but fostered as my own soul-born girl and I determined [to give her in marriage to a bridegroom where his] boldness is the only bounty.

By the way, this is the same way that Venkateshwara's wife Padmavathi was born; the king Akasa Raja was doing the ceremonial ploughing for a Putrakameshthi Yagna when he spotted a baby girl. See the Tirumala Sthala Purana I linked to in my question here.

  • Is the Putrakameshthi Yagna specifically for getting a girl child? – Naveen Nov 26 '15 at 15:36
  • @Naveen No, it's usually done for getting a male child. – Keshav Srinivasan Nov 26 '15 at 15:37
  • Is there any Yajna that is meant for getting a girl child? Is there any instances in the scripture where a girl child was sought after through yajnas and tapas (other than Sati and Draupadi)? – Naveen Nov 26 '15 at 15:37
  • @Naveen I'm not sure, but I'm guessing there isn't. Getting a son is very important, because it's your Dharma to have male offspring in order to satisfy your debt to the Pitris. Having a girl child isn't necessary in the same way. – Keshav Srinivasan Nov 26 '15 at 15:40
  • So the Yajna that king Draupad performed was common for both girl and boy child? Or was separate Yajnas performed for Dhrishtadyumna and Draupadi? – Naveen Nov 26 '15 at 15:43
2

Society at the time of Janaka was an agrarian society. Kings led by example. Janaka's name means 'Progenitor' or 'Father'. Sita means 'Furrow'. A plow is used to place the seed in the earth and 'create' the furrow. By plowing the earth, Janaka - the father - was placing the seed into mother Earth. Sita was not born of a human mother, but mother Earth. The story is highly symbolic, although not having a human mother, Sita is still born from the union of a father and mother. See Ramayana 1.66.14-15

  • 2
    The ploughing of the field was a precursor to a yagna not the literal act of laying crops. – user1195 Sep 4 '15 at 14:45

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