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Questions regarding the study of the origin of words and the way in which their meanings have changed throughout history.

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There is no universally accepted answer to your question. However, because knowing how something came to be can help us better understand that thing, here's the etymology (history & origin) of the … word. Etymology of Ásura According to Wiktionary it's, From Proto-Indo-Aryan * Hásuras, from Proto-Indo-Iranian * Hásuras, from Proto-Indo-European * h₂ń̥suros. Related to असु (asu-), with …
answered Sep 27 by Rubellite Yakṣī
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It has always struck me as interesting, or perhaps odd, that the root phonemes of Shiva, [sh]+[v], are the reverse of the root phonemes of Vishnu, [v]+[sh]. Is there any accounting for this?
asked Apr 26 '18 by Rubellite Yakṣī
3
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Anurag Singh commented: No. 'Shiva' is made with श ś (not ष ṣ ), and 'Vishnu' is made with ष ṣ (not श ś ) . श ś is a palatal Sh sound, and ष ṣ is retroflex Sh sound. In English alphabet there is n …
answered Apr 27 '18 by Rubellite Yakṣī
2
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Controversial though it may sound, all are Hindus—whether they know it or not. Some are more sinful, some are more righteous. Some are more knowledgeable, others have none. But, the same Universal law …
answered Apr 28 '18 by Rubellite Yakṣī