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As I discuss in this question, by far the most popular school of Hindu philosophy is the Vedanta school. But there are five other Astika or orthodox schools of Hindu philosophy: Purva Mimamsa, Samkhya …
asked Sep 18 '17 by Keshav Srinivasan
8
votes
2answers
, resemble human beings rather than other animals? Or to put it another way, why is it that humans resemble the gods, Asuras, Gandharvas, etc., and other animals do not? The reason I ask is that critics of …
asked Jul 27 '17 by Keshav Srinivasan
1
vote
0answers
substances there originate worms and other little animals. And here is what the Gaudiya Vaishnava commentator Baladeva Vidyabhushana says in this excerpt of his Govinda Bhashya: The word tu (but) is … Godhead, just as many things are manifested from sources very different in nature, just as worms come from honey, as elephants, horses, and other animals come from the kalpa-druma tree, and as gold and …
asked Apr 14 '17 by Keshav Srinivasan
5
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0answers
A Rajasthan High Court judge recently made the following statement: Peacock is a Bramhachari and it does not have sex with a peahen. The peahen gets pregnant drinking the tears of the peacock. Eve …
asked May 31 '17 by Keshav Srinivasan
4
votes
1answer
matter, such as cow-dung, scorpions and similar animals are produced. And here is what the Sri Vaishnava commentator Ramanujacharya says: The 'but' indicates the change of view (introduced in the … things of different nature stand to each other in the relation of cause and effect. For it is observed that from honey and similar substances there originate worms and other little animals.--But it has …
asked Apr 5 '17 by Keshav Srinivasan
7
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0answers
The Ashva Shastra is a work of unknown authorship about the nature and proper care of horses. Now this chapter of the Ashva Shastra says that there used to be winged horses, but then Indra asked the …
asked Apr 20 by Keshav Srinivasan
8
votes
2answers
As I discuss in this question, by far the most popular school of Hindu philosophy is the Vedanta school. But there are five other Astika or orthodox schools of Hindu philosophy: Purva Mimamsa, Samkhya …
asked Sep 16 '17 by Keshav Srinivasan
4
votes
0answers
injury, from the text “Injure not.” Because at any rate, [there is] a likelihood of leaves of trees as well as small animals being destroyed through proximity to fire. Hence it is a source of pain … Vedic Yagnas can be a source of sin. My question is, are there any other Samkhya works which discuss the danger of Yagna fires to plants and animals in the area? The reason I ask is that Narayana Tirtha …
asked Jul 20 '17 by Keshav Srinivasan
6
votes
0answers
well-known, however, is that Sharabeshwara wasn't a one-of-a-kind creature; Sharabhas are legendary animals described in Hindu scripture. They're eight legged half-lion half-bird creatures that are … sheep which they had sacrificed, became a camel. The goat which they had sacrificed, became a sharabha. For this reason one should not eat (the flesh) of these animals, for these animals are deprived of …
asked Sep 29 '17 by Keshav Srinivasan
4
votes
0answers
The term "Shaivite" is overused nowadays. For instance, Iyer Brahmins are often called Shaivites, but they're actually followers of Adi Shankaracharya's Smartha sect (which I discuss here and here), a …
asked Mar 21 '17 by Keshav Srinivasan
6
votes
0answers
The term "Shaivite" is overused nowadays. For instance, Iyer Brahmins are often called Shaivites, but they're actually followers of Adi Shankaracharya's Smartha sect (which I discuss here and here), a …
asked Jan 5 '17 by Keshav Srinivasan
9
votes
1answer
interested in the part in bold. Deva is clear enough, Nara means human, and the translator clarified that Tiryak means “animals and creatures” and Sthavara means “plants etc.” My question is, what …
asked Mar 13 by Keshav Srinivasan