8

Aswamedha yajna was a royal rite. It was done only by the Kings to spread their glory throughout the world and for the benefit of their kingdom (rāṣṭram vā aśvamedhaḥ). Regarding its origin and usage of horses the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad says: सोऽकामयत: मेध्यं म इदं स्याद् , आत्मन्व्यनेन स्यामिति ततोऽश्वः समभवद् यदश्वत् , तन्मेध्यमभूदिति तदेवा...


7

Yes there is wonderful story of Hanuman fighting with Lord Shiva and Shree Rama only appearing in the battlefield but not fighting with Shiva.The story is from the time of Shree Rama's Ashwamedha Yagna. Rishi Agastya advices Shree Rama to perform Ashwamedha yajna. Shree Rama then appoints Shatrughna as protector of sacrificial horse and the horse is set ...


7

The detail list of all animals, birds and marine creatures which were tied in Yajna-Shala is present in Ashwamedha Prakarana of Vajaseniya samhita of Shukla Yajurveda. The 24 adhyay of Shukla yajurveda samhita is only dedicated for description of those animals and the respected gods for whome they were tied to pole. The creatures mentioned are as follows....


7

Your confusion is well warranted since the purpose of both the Yagnyas seems to be the establishment of overlordship over other kingdoms and make them accept the sovereignty of the king performing the ceremony. However there are two major differences in the two rituals: FIRST is that while Rajasuya gives access to heaven as a member of Indra's court, a 100 ...


6

Srikantha Sivacharya is referring to this chapter of the Uttara Kanda of the Ramayana, in which Brahma's son Kardama explains how the lunar dynasty king Ila's problem of continually changing between a man and a woman can be solved: कर्दमस्त्वब्रवीद्वाक्यं सुतार्थ परमं हितम्। द्विजाः शृणुत मद्वाक्यं यच्छेयः पार्थिवस्य हि।॥११ ।। For the welfare of ...


6

This chapter of the Shatapatha Brahmana of the Yajur Veda describes the animals sacrificed in an Ashwamedha Yagna: For this (day) there are those sacrificial animals--'A horse, a hornless he-goat, and a Gomriga,' fifteen 'paryaṅgyas': the mystic import of these has been explained. Then these wild ones--for spring he seizes (three) kapiñgalas, for ...


5

The last king to perform the Aśvamedha yajña was the 18th century Rajput ruler Sawai Jai Singh. In History of Dharmaśāstra, Vol II Part II, P. V. Kane lists a few others: In Indian Antiquary vol. VIII. p. 273 (at p. 278) we find that a general, called Udayacandra, of Nandivarma Pallavamalla (about the 9th century A. D.) defeated Pṛthivīvyāghra, king of ...


4

Here is how this journal paper translates it: He (the Sacrificer, i.e. the king) offers the samgrahani ishti. (When he is about to offer that oblation, he says:) “I will keep this community together (under my authority).” The paper also provides this explanation on what the verse is saying: According to Apastamba 20.1.4, the Sacrificer offers the ...


4

The particular sexual interaction “Then they draw out the penis of the horse and place it in the vagina of the chief queen...” is nowhere to be found in the paralel English translation by Julius Eggeling. It could be something made up by a biased translator. It also doesn't mention anything about the horse being slaughtered. Finally, the below translation ...


3

Is there any scriptural refrence regarding this point that sacrificed animal can come back to life if mantras are chanted rightly? This can't be possible because there are actually mantras from the veda samhitas uttered in the animal sacrifice and addressed to the sacrificial animal that explicitly wish the animal a speedy journey to swarga after it's ...


3

I think you must be relating about the story of Veeramani in Utthara Ramayan who was great Shiva devotee. He took the horse of Lord Rama and didn't give it back to Hanuman when it was asked and hence a battle broke out. When Veermani prayed Lord Shiva in battle ground to protect his devotee kingdom, Shiva's furious form Veerabhadra came out along with Nandi ...


2

Ashwamedha Yajna was done to empower your kingdom and glory, so the ashwa(Horse) was Sacrafice(send Free to go anywhere). And what so ever the land the Horse was going to cover would be considered as a Integral part of the Kingdom of the person/King who had performed the ritual of Ashwamedha Yajna(Yudhisther and Pariksheet had done for the said cause). If ...


2

In The Origins and Development of Classical Hinduism, A. L. Basham talks about the symbolism behind this practice. Ch. 2. Early Speculations and the Later Sacrificial Cults ... A feature of the aśvamedha which has aroused considerable comment is the sexual character of one of the concluding ceremonies. The chief queen lay down beside the ...


1

It is actually based on the concept that: We are not this body but we are sprit soul. So when the sacrificial animal is sacrificed, the sages due to high consciousness and power obtained from tapasya and austerities, had the power to remove the soul from one body while sacrificing the old body and gifted the soul of the sacrificial animal a new body of the ...


1

Why is the queen required to sleep next to the dead horse at the end of Aśvamedha Yajña? Because it is a fertility rite that rejuvenates the kingdom and makes it prosper. There are material and spiritual rewards from doing those things as part of the yajna. From the Taittiriya Brahmana: [The Mahishi (chief queen of the king performing the Ashwamedha) lies ...


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