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Attachment is poison disguised as love. In attachment you care for others only for your benefit. That's why you hear things like "I did so many things for so and so person and see what I got back in return". Where was love here if you expecting someone in return? It's called hidden business. Love is a very high word. Not everyone can love. Most of ...


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Bg. 1.9.: अन्ये च बहवः श‍ूरा मदर्थे त्यक्तजीविताः । नानाशस्त्रप्रहरणाः सर्वे युद्धविशारदाः ॥ ९ ॥ anye ca bahavaḥ śūrā mad-arthe tyakta-jīvitāḥ nānā-śastra-praharaṇāḥ sarve yuddha-viśāradāḥ Synonyms.: anye — others; ca — also; bahavaḥ — in great numbers; śūrāḥ — heroes; mat-arthe — for my sake; tyakta-jīvitāḥ — prepared to risk life; nānā — many; śastra — ...


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The threefold miseries mentioned in this particular translation refers to - adhyatmika (misery due to one's own body and mind), adhibhautika (misery due to other living entities) and adhidaivika (misery due to nature). You can refer to this site for more understanding, it contains commentaries of BG from all the major Acharyas of different sampradayas - ...


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I checked three translations of Gita 2.56. None of the translators uses the term threefold miseries in translating the verse. However, Sri Sankaracharya talks about threefold miseries in his commentary. Whose mind is not agitated in adversity, who is free from desire and who is devoid of attachments, fear and anger - such a person is called a sage of steady ...


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It means that a man who has attained moksha goes beyond the teachings of the scripture. He has directly experienced the Truth and does not depend on scripture for spiritual teachings. Scriptures are unnecessary for the man who has attained the insight. See Gita II.46; VI.44. He who attains the wisdom of the Supreme passes beyond the range of the Vedas and ...


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