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Both Nirvana & Moksha are liberation from Samsara(repeating cycle of birth, death & rebirth). To understand the difference between them, we'll see what Moksha & Nirvana is as per many schools of Hinduism & Buddhism(only a very high level view). Advaita Advaita school believes in Jivanmukti(liberation here and now). One can attain Moksha ...


3

Yes, in ancient times that used to be the practice when a Dvija used to spend 48 years in the Brahmacharya Ashrama (the student phase of life). And, in that phase, maintaining celibacy is to be fulfilled as it's a vow. The Baudhayana Dharma Sutras state that: 1 Forty-eight years, according to ancient practice, is the period of studentship for studying ...


3

Those who attain Jivanmukti through Yogic methods, their diseases are all destroyed in an earlier stage only (i.e. much before attaining the Highest Knowledge). Svetasvatara Upanishad states: II-12: When the fivefold perception of Yoga, arising from (concentrating the mind on) earth, water, light, air and ether, have appeared to the Yogin, then he ...


3

I am answering from the perspective of Advaita Vedanta. In Advaita Vedanta, AgyAna or ignorance is considered as endowed with the 3 Gunas - TrigunAtmikA. Other terminologies used for AgyAna are AvidyA and MAyA. See the following flow charts, which I took from the concluding section of the book VedAnta SArah - Essence of VedAnta (Sri Sadananda Yogindra ...


3

Moksha describes becoming one with the only thing that is absolutely real or is permanent. This answer might lean towards Advaita for Moksha. Nirvana describes becoming detached and liberated from everything that is not permanent. The description for Nirvana is the same for all Buddhist schools. In both cases, the individual self no longer reincarnates ...


3

No it is not. Powers are a diversion which keeps one bound to this world. Patanjali in his Yoga Aphorisms, Chapter 3 (commentary by Swami Vivekananda; available here under the heading Raja Yoga, sub-heading Patanjali's Yoga Aphorisms, sub-sub heading Powers - http://cwsv.belurmath.org/volume_1/vol_1_frame.htm): By making Samyama on the discrimination ...


2

I am answering acc. to Sri Vainava (VisishtAdvaita) Sampradayam The Vedas exclaim that having created the vast universe, the Supreme Brahman holds it with perfect precision, pervading each and every aspect of it in its entirety. This truth may be accepted at an intellectual level by many of us, but to experience it as the absolute truth is the essence of ...


2

Yoga(union with Brahman) is liberation or Moksha. Having said that, there are essentially four paths to achieve this. THE FOUR PATHS OF YOGA There are four main paths of Yoga - Karma Yoga, Janna Yoga, Bhakti Yoga and Raja Yoga. Each is suited to a different temperament or approach to life. All the paths lead ultimately to the same destination - to union ...


2

First, your statement that the Upanishads were 'appended' to the vedas is a misunderstanding. The Upanishads are part of and included in each veda. They are at the end of each veda. 'anta' as is vedanta means the concluding or the culmination - it does not mean append. My answer is based upon Swami Nikhilananda's comments on pages 2-9 of his Introduction to ...


2

Mundaka Upanishad III.ii.3: This Atman is not to be attained by the study of the Vedas, nor by the highest intellect, nor by much learning. Whom the Atman seeks, he gets the Atman; unto him He discloses His glory. Katha Upansihad II.iii.15: When all the knots of the heart are destroyed, even while a man is alive, then a mortal beomes immortal. This ...


1

Deeksha may be or may not be necessary for attaining Brahma Jnana or SELF REALISATION. It depends on the prArabdha of the individual concerned. 1) Ramakrishna "Gadadhar" Chattopadhyay later known as Sri Ramakrishna Paramahamsa had Gurus for initiating him into various methods of worship of the Almighty. Bhairavi Brahmani initiated Ramakrishna into Tantra, ...


1

To get an understanding of how one can become realized the best guide is Bhagwat Gita. So you might wanna start on that a bit. On the other hand, as per my understanding of Gita (very limited understanding), there are 3 categories to it that are: Karm-Yog, Bhakti-Yog, and Sankhya-Yog. These are not totally mutually exclusive, but more intertwined within ...


1

Contrary to popular belief, enlightenment does not technically mandate a Guru. However, just like studying a Chess game by a Grandmaster helps avoid common pitfalls, studying a path that a truly enlightened one took would help and sure does. Ask these questions to a supposed Guru.you will know the fake ones. This is assuming your values are as appropriate ...


1

Mudakopanishad says -"Brahmavid Brahmaiva Bhavathi" One who knows Brahman is Brahman. But who knows it completely or correctly? "Aham Nirvikalpo Niraakaara Rupo, Vibhutvaaccha Sarvatra Sarvendriyaanaam Na Chaa Sangatan Naiva Muktir Na meyah Chidananda Rupah Shivoham Shivoham" says Nirvanashtakam. It means:- " I am all pervasive. I am without any ...


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Bhakti is one of the ways in developing an inclination towards the God, whereas the REALISATION stage of the sages like Sri Ramana Maharshi is the final stage. Many saints, who started in Bhakti marga, finally ended in SELF REALISATION. Yogi Ramaiah, Saint Namadev, etc, are a few such people quoted for illustration purpose. Saint Namadev was a devotee ...


1

There is a huge misconception about Siddhis and source of special powers. I am over simplifying here to focus on the misconception. And highlight Siddhis Vs Shaktis, both special powers but from a different source. There are 2 paths: Path of Patanjali - AstangaYoga: (via Siddhis) As you seek enlightenment you go through different stages where the end ...


1

Brahman is defined in Vedanta as Sat Chit Ananda. Sat means knowledge, Chit means existence and Ananda means bliss. Jivas are also in some sense sat chit ananda. The problem is that we jivas are equally confident that we are no such thing but mere humans. Various Yogas are methods to let us experience our true nature as sat chit ananda and thus attain moksha....


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