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15

A complete description of senses and how to control them have been written by the great Seer Sri Swami Sivnananda. 'Control of the Indriyas by Sri Swami Sivananda'. Senses Senses are not different from Mind in 'Control of the Indriyas by Sri Swami Sivananda'. Sri Swami Sivananda says about the senses: Indriyas are objectified desires. Will to see is ...


13

The path of knowledge is commonly referred to as Jnana Yoga. What is meant by Jnana depends upon the scripture being read. Oftentimes scripture will distinguish between Vijnana (refers to Knowledge -meaning Realization of Brahman, Transcendent Perception of the Ultimate) and Jnana (meaning mental and scriptural knowledge/understanding of Brahman, but not ...


10

The single line answer is "Pure bhakthi and Pure Jnana are same". If you try to study both gurus lives, you will understand that: Sankaracharya is outwardly jnani but inside he is a pure bhaktha. Sri Ramakrishna is Outwardly bhaktha but inside he is pure Jnani. Sankara himself re-initiated most of famous south Indian temple daily procedures and we can ...


8

Jnana or Jivanmukti is a state wherein, all the perceptions of duality is removed and the non-dual alone remains. In Isha Upanishad a Jnani is defined as a person "who perceives his Self in all objects and all objects in his Self/Atman" Basically, Atma-Jnana or Brahma-Jnana means, realizing first-hand that one's true identity is not body or mind, but is ...


7

Good question sir. Here is an advaita view on this. According to this view, the jiva and Paramatma are one. Jnana Jnana means wisdom. Wisdom of what? Wisdom of your own True Nature is Jnana. You are not this body, nor are you the mind, nor the intellect, nor the individual ego. You are the Brahman, God. Adi Shankaracharya's Nirvana Shatakam Mano-...


7

They're equally important. I'm here quoting some relevant quotes of Swami Vivekananda from The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda/Volume 3/Bhakti-Yoga/Definition of Bhakti: There is not really so much difference between knowledge (Jnana) and love (Bhakti) as people sometimes imagine. We shall see, as we go on, that in the end they converge and meet ...


6

Raja Yoga is the method of attaining Realization through the control of the prana and psychic forces. The methods as outlined by Patanjali in his Yoga Aphorisms are for the most part accepted as the way to practice it in modern Vedanta. Swami Vivekananda says in the Preface to his book Raja Yoga (which includes his translation of Patanjali's Yoga Aphorisms), ...


6

It is popularly believed that Sankara taught only Jnana. But an examination of his writings reveals otherwise. In his Vivekachudamani, Crest Jewel of Discrimination, Sankara says (Swami Madhavananda translator): verse 31. Among things conducive to Liberation, devotion (Bhakti) alone holds the supreme place. The seeking after one's real nature is ...


6

Yes the sloka is from Garuda Puranam (2.49.98). The following images(& texts) are from the book called Garuda Purana Saaraam(The essence of Garuda Purana). tŸvat tapo vrataÄ t rthaÄ japa homŸrcanŸdikam | veda ÀŸstrŸgama kathŸ yŸvat tattvaÄ na vindati || 2.49.98 || Penances, vows, pilgrimage, prayers, sacrifice, worship, scriptural study and ...


5

Merge of Bhakti into Jnana: According to Bhagavad Gita, verse 10.10 & 10.11 (English translation from Gitapress): तेषां सततयुक्तानां भजतां प्रीतिपूर्वकम् । ददामि बुद्धियोगं तं येन मामुपयान्ति ते ॥ On those ever united through meditation with Me and worshipping Me with love, I confer that Yoga of wisdom by which they come to Me. तेषामेवा...


5

According to Adi Sankaracharya commentary on this verse, Jijnashu is one who wants to know the reality of the lord and Jnani is one who already have intellectual knowledge and aspires of liberation. 7.16 Again, O Arjuna, foremost of the Bharata dynasty, caturvidhah, four classes; of janah, people; who are eminent among human beings and are pious in ...


5

TL;DR Short Answer Sri Krishna teaches: Undoubtedly, O Arjuna, the mind is restless and hard to control. But by practice (abhyasa) and dispassion (vairagya) it can be controlled. [BG 6.35] Charity, the performance of one's duty, the observance of vows, general and particular, the hearing of the scriptures, meritorious acts, and all other ...


4

Parbrahman Paramatma is different from an individual's aatma in the domain of time. The universe was created by single consciousness by its reflections just like one Sun reflects into million reflections in million pots filled with water. So does One Paramatma(Supersoul) reflects/divides into infinite Aatmas(souls). Eko ham, bahu syam - Vedas I am ...


4

Bhagavad Gita Chapter 4 is a good starting point. See: Chapter 4 text and commentaries by 4 renowned Vaishnava Sampradayas Video Lectures on Chapter 4 of Bhagavad Gita To get the gist of it see these series of videos by Swami Sarvapriyananda of Ramakrishna Mission: Message of the Upanishads and Who am I? videos


3

In the Bhagavad Gita Arjuna Enquires from Bhagavan who is perfect? Whether a person engaged in devotional service to him or those who worship the impersonal brahman. Then Lord replied that "mayy avesya mano ye mam nitya-yukta upasate sraddhaya parayopetas te me yuktatama matah" He whose mind is fixed on My personal form, always engaged in worshiping Me ...


3

The clearest statement of Jnana that I have come across is that of Yudhisthira in Mahabharata: There are two well-known paths (for us), viz, the path of the Pitris and the path of the gods. They that perform sacrifices go by the Pitri-path, while they that are for salvation, go by the god-path. By penances, by Brahmacharya, by study (of the Vedas), ...


3

Ramkrishna had tried many different methods of spiritual growth including Tantra. He found Kaali Upasana particularly engaging but soon realized that he is not progressing spiritually and graduating from Dwaita to Adwaita. Under the guidance of Totapuri, a master in Adwaita school, he attained the Nirvikalp Samadhi state. The account is mentioned in the ...


3

Jnana and Vijnana The difference between jnana and vijnana occurs in the Sri Ramakrishna Paramahansa tradition. According to this tradition: Jnana Jnana means knowledge. Knowledge of what. Knowledge of Brahman as the only reality. However this is not complete non-duality, (or Advaita), this is because if you are aware of knowledge, then you are aware of ...


2

Is Jnana means knowledge alone or knowledge by experience in Hinduism? According to Ramanujacharya in the Sri Bhashya, the word jnana in the Upanishads means something more than an intellectual understanding of the texts, but instead means direct, self-realization of Brahman. He says, But a distinction has here to be made regarding the nature of this ...


2

There are two identities one is defined by your family tree . The second is your true self ( Atman) which is secretly coded by God. The process of life should be how closer you bring your atma (Consciousness) to the Brahman . The process of bringing our everyday thoughts , decision and action nearer to Brahman (True Knowledge)is called "SuKarma " Good ...


2

Jnana Yoga or Janna Marga (wisdom or knowledge) is considered the most difficult of the four main paths of Yoga namely; 1.Jnana Yoga. 2.Karma Yoga. 3.Bhakti Yoga and 4.Raja Yoga. Jnana Yoga requires great strength of will and a deep intellect. Jnana Yoga’s main focus is on self-inquiry, and in this context one must remember the famous phrase “WHO AM ...


2

The scriptures say that all these 3 paths are valid methods to Moksha. So, one can choose one depending on one's aptitudes. And, it is not like that if one follows any one of them, one can not follow any other. A combined approach is also possible as stated in the following passages (read the 2nd blockquote, which clearly talks about the combined approach) ...


2

These are not independent paths to Moksha, but rather steps that build upon one another and thereby lead to Moksha. This excerpt from Vedanta Desikan's Rahasyatraya Sara describes the progression of Karma Yoga, Jnana Yoga, and Bhakti Yoga: Karma Yoga means the performance of certain kinds of Karmas or rites and duties as the result of knowledge acquired ...


1

Both paths will lead to God. Bhaktiyoga is the religion for this age. But that does not mean that the lover of God will reach one goal and the philosopher (Jnani) and worker (Karmayogi) another. It means that if a person seeks the knowledge of Brahman he can attain It by following the path of Bhakti too. God, who loves His devotee, can give him ...


1

Your question is very appropriate as it includes proper submissive inquiry. That is implied from Bhagavad Gita 4.34 The topmost path is Bhakti Yoga (although 99% population conclude jnana wrongly). This fact is based on multiple verses from Vedas. The Bhagavad Gita, which is condensed summary of all Vedas for this age is sufficient to prove this fact in ...


1

As no explicit question is asked, I assume that the question is this: Are Bhakti Yoga and Raja Yoga part of either Gnana Yoga or Karma Yoga? No, they are not: Bhakti Yoga: The Path of Devotion God's love is unconditional. Acknowledging that love and reflecting it back is devotion. The blossoming of devotion towards God is the sweetest experience ...


1

Sankaracharya has clearly stated that only Jnana or knowledge can lead to moksha. Sruti clearly teaches that no road other than knowledge leads to moksha. Vide: "Knowing Him alone one conquers death: no other road is available for going there" (Svetasvatara Upanishad 3.8). Furher, 6.20 (ibid) teaches that the non-knower's achievement of moksha is ...


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