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Yes, Ravana did speak Sanskrit. In fact, in this chapter of the Sundara Kanda of the Valmiki Ramayana, Hanuman hesitates before speaking to Sita in Lanka, because he's afraid that Sita will mistake him for Ravana, since Hanuman spoke the same educated Sanskrit that Ravana spoke, as Ravana was a Brahmana: If I use Sanskrit language like a brahmin, Seetha ...


17

No. Sanātana Dharma doesn't allow chanting "translation" of Veda Mantras. Samhitas are core portions of Vedas. They are directly heard by sages in deep tapasya (transcendental meditation). One must chant these Veda mantras exactly how those Rishis heard. Hence Vedas are called Shruti (that which is heard). Mrityunjaya Mahamantra or any Veda mantra must be ...


7

I'm really surprised there is no English translation to this famous stotra on Hanuman. I searched on the internet but wasn't able to find any, most of the "English" translations were just transliterated Sanskrit texts. So I decided to translate it on my own since my native language happens to be Marathi. A site where they hosted Samartha Ramadasa's books ...


5

If you are asking-- what's the language of the Gods -- then it is Sanskrit. From this Agni Purana chapter: Sanskrit is the language of the gods. The language of humans is Prakrita. Poetry can be either in Sanskrit or in Prakrita. There are three types of poetry. These are gadya (prose), padya (poetry) or mishra ( a mixture of the two), Genuine ...


4

First of all: when it comes to the age of a language, there is a difference to be observed in dating by means of actual things, that still exist and other methods based on other evidence. Speaking about the first one, we are talking mostly about rock inscriptions, since these are quite durable and judged by these, Sanskrit and Tamil are approximately of the ...


3

Anurag Singh commented: No. 'Shiva' is made with श ś (not ष ṣ ), and 'Vishnu' is made with ष ṣ (not श ś ) . श ś is a palatal Sh sound, and ष ṣ is retroflex Sh sound. In English alphabet there is no symbol for श and ष , so we write both as Sh, as using phonetic symbols like ś and ṣ always is not convenient. For linguistic reference, in IPA श ś can be the ...


3

Rishi Valmiki who wrote the Ramayan was a contemporary of Shri Rama. The fact that he wrote the entire epic in Sanskrit points to the fact that it was the spoken language in those days. Same logic applies to the Mahabharat as well which was composed by Rishi Ved-Vyas & narrates the life-stories of his grandsons the Kauravs and Pandavs. Also, Pali and ...


3

There is a passage in Mahabharata Anusasana Parva Section XLI that states: Then the lady endeavoured to answer him. Vipula, however restrained the words she intended to utter. The words, therefore, that actually escaped her lips (under the influence of Vipula) were, ‘What is the reason of thy coming hither?’ These words adorned with grammatical ...


3

Yes, the same is also the case in Sanskrit and the term is Prakruti. It is used both as human nature and the nature around us, that is the material nature of God [BG - 13.19]. It is also same as maya: māyāṃ tu prakṛtiṃ vidyānmāyinaṃ tu maheśvaraṃ [Sve. Up. - 4.10] - Know that maya is Prakruti and the lord of maya is God In scriptures, the human nature ...


3

Sonorously composed chants of the Vedas propagate audible energy. Beneficial placement of sounds to rhyme with with unknown/esoteric Beeja Aksharas will get watered down in translation/transliteration and lose their vitality of vibration originally intended by the composer (and adopted through centuries of popular usage) ..if delivered inappropriately.There ...


3

A translation is 'revered thought'. In Chapter 13 of A Critical Survey of Indian Philosophy, Chandradhar Sharma writes (https://archive.org/stream/IndianPhilosophyACriticalSurvey/Indian-Philosophy-A-Critical-Survey_djvu.txt): Chapter Thirteen PORVA-MlMAMSA I INTRODUCTION The word 'Mimamsa' literally means 'revered thought’ and was ...


2

I got some interesting points from this website. Though I don't know whether they are authentic or not, I am simply summarizing it. There are no ancient Zoroastrian texts that refer to their language as “Avestan” In fact no one knew of any original Zoroastrian language of any name, be it Avestan or any other name. Then why and how do present day historians ...


2

This answer is based on my own experience with Vedic Sanskrit, Avestan and Persian. So, I can't provide any sources. If Vedas are apaurusheya and eternal - how can it be justified that they are in Sanskrit? No, Vedas are not in Sanskrit. Vedas are in Vedic Sanskrit, which has no script at all, unlike other common European languages. Though present day ...


2

yes. Ishvara understands every language, he needs only that it should be chanted with devotion, purity and surrender to Him. Lord Krishna, The Supreme Lord Says in Bhagvad Gita — BG 7.19 — After many births and deaths, he who is actually in knowledge surrenders unto Me, knowing Me to be the cause of all causes and all that is. Such a great soul is very ...


2

Sanskrit is not the language of the human beings but that of the Gods. For humans the language is Prakrit. So, they should have been speaking in Prakrit only. From this Agni Purana chapter: Sanskrit is the language of the gods. The language of humans is Prakrita. Poetry can be either in Sanskrit or in Prakrita. There are three types of poetry. These ...


2

संस्कृतम् (Sanskritam) Any language can have 2 components - sound and sight - the words we hear and the script we write. The sounds of Vedas are eternal (literally exist infinite time before and infinite time after). They are not made by man, rather they just exist in nature as the breath of Brahmam, and are perceived by rishis during deep state of tapas. ...


1

Short answer Vedas started with just भाषा(language). लिपि(script) came long after that. The trend of writing in देवनागरी(devanaagari) script is very recent. Long answer First - about the Veda: Vedas are known as Shrutis(something that was heard). It was preserved for generations as an oral tradition (कण्ठस्थ). Second - the language: The language of the ...


1

All Vedas are written in Sanskrit. Sanskrit is believed to be the language of the Devas. Hence it's script is called Devanagari(of the city of gods). Initially they were remembered in the mind only, but with the passage of time, human memory became weakened so they had to be put in writing. Even this was considered sacrilege https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


1

Either there r 2 or there r 3 pronunciations told of Pranav. 1)ओSम् this is pluta o & ends with half m which is anunasik naad end. This pronunciation contains a+u+a+m= a+u=o & o+a = pluta o. This is told in taittiriya pratishakhya text. 2)औँ - anusvar or chandrabindu when nothing ahead r half m automatically in Sanskrit mantras. In Shukla yajurved ...


1

It is like saying the alphabet 'O' and Mmmmmm. So it's Ommmmm. And the humming sound which its product is the basic calming monotone that helps one to meditate. Focus on the hum as if you're hearing from your throat or the middle of forehead (3rd eye). That is what has been for ages for every meditation group/religion


1

Vedic Sanskrit is much older than Pali texts. The Rig Veda was composed around 1500 - 1100 BCE, while the Buddhist text Tripitaka was composed between 500 - 1 BCE. Vedic sages are also referenced in the Tripitaka (see Majjhima Nikaya 95). Interestingly, MN95 mentions three Vedas and not four. This proves that the Vedas are older than the Tripitaka. See ...


1

The oldest surviving Buddhist texts in the Pali language come from the relic chamber of a Buddhist stupa at Sri Ksetra. They consist of a twenty-leaf manuscript of solid gold and a large gilded reliquary of silver. A new and exhaustive palaeographic study of these inscriptions shows that they date from the mid-fifth to mid-sixth century AD. This ...


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