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20

You are right about the statement from Gita. But its implication is different. You are talking about the following verse: sarva-bhūtāni kaunteya prakṛtiṁ yānti māmikām kalpa-kṣaye punas tāni kalpādau visṛjāmy aham [BG - 9.7] Meaning O son of Kuntī, at the end of the kalpa, all the beings and material nature (prakruti) enter into Me, and at the ...


17

The answer is simple. Just ask yourself: How attached am I to this material life? How much material desire do I have? Do I like the life experience here? Depending upon your answers and how you feel about them, you can easily decide which path is suitable for you. Because the scripture says the following: nirviṇṇānāṁ jñāna-yogo nyāsinām iha karmasu ...


10

Moksha is a permanent state because sruti says so. Brahma Sutras 4.4.22 says (Swami Vireswarananda translator, available here - http://www.wisdomlib.org/hinduism/book/brahma-sutras/d/doc62753.html): (There is) no return (for those released souls); on account of scriptural declaration (to that effect). In his commentary to this verse, Sankara references 2 ...


10

Yes Moksha is permanent. As Krishna says in Bhagavad Gita: na tad bhāsayate sūryo na śaśāṅko na pāvakaḥ yad gatvā na nivartante tad dhāma paramaṁ mama [BG - 15.6] That supreme abode of Mine is not illumined by the sun or moon, nor by fire or electricity. Those who reach it never return to this material world.


8

As I discussed in this answer, according to Vedanta, the only way to attain Moksha is to realize Brahman. ShvetaShvatar Upanishad: वेदाहमेतं पुरुषं महान्त- मादित्यवर्णं तमसः परस्तात् । तमेव विदित्वातिमृत्युमेति नान्यः पन्था विद्यतेऽयनाय ॥ ८॥ III-8: I have realized this Great Being who shines effulgent like the sun beyond all ...


8

Mukti does not necessarily always mean Moksha. it depends on how the word is used in the sentence. For example in the words like Rogamukti (freedom from disease), Rinamukti (freedom from debt) etc it does not mean Moksha at all but simply freedom or to get rid off. But when used in that context then Mukti means Moksha. Then those are just two different ...


8

Apparently not possible. Dharma Sadhana or Moksha sadhana is possible only in this world or the Ihaloka. It is not possible to do the same in Paraloka or in afterlife that is in either Swarga or Naraka. Here is a relevant verse from a Shakta Agama called KulArnava Tantram: Ihaiva NarakavyAdheshchikitsAm Na Karoti Yah | (1) GatvA Niraushadham SthAnam ...


7

With attaining the right knowledge, birth-rebirth cycle brakes and ignorance(अविद्या) & illusion(माया) can no more hold. Within kalpa, birth-rebirth is due to ignorance & maya, similarly creation & dissolution of the whole is also due to ignorance & maya. In another word both cycles 1. Cycles of birth-rebirth cycles within kapla, 2. Cycle ...


6

Many words are used. In general a realized person is known in the scriptures as Atma GyAni, Tattvavid, TattvagyAni, Mukto etc. Opposites will be Baddha (bound), agyAni (ooposite of GyAni) etc. Have a look at the following verse (from KulArnava Tantram 9.42): Jivah shivah shivo jivah sa jivah kevalah shivah | PAshabaddhah smrito jivah pAshamuktah ...


6

It is not only according to Hinduism, It applies to all religious, Karma Yoga is the best way to reach god and it is also a best way of achieving "Moksha". From tripod.com Karma Yoga As we have seen, karma yoga can be described as the way of faithful action without any interest in its effects and without any personal sense of giving. In other ...


5

The answer to your question is Yes. This is what Lord Shiva says in KulArnava Tantram's 9th chapter: Aswamedhayutenapi BrahmahatyAtena Cha | PunyapApairna Lipyante YeshAm Brahma Hridi StithAm || ............... Those who have realized self (or Brahman) are neither affected by the performance of thousands of Aswamedha yajna nor by the sins ...


5

Which astika schools mention those muktis? These different types of muktis you have mentioned belong to the bhakti school of thought where God is considered to have a spiritual form with attributes (sakara and saguna). But because bhakti school of thought doesn't directly belong to the six philosophical schools (saddarshana), these concepts of mukti can be ...


5

There can be many obvious terms for non-realized beings, as "deluded" or "covered by ignorance" or "bound". BG 5.15 - The Omnipresent neither accepts anybody's sin nor even virtue. Knowledge remains covered by ignorance. Thus the creatures become deluded. BG 3.27 — All actions are enacted in Prakruti by [3] modes (guna-s). Bound by ego(false identity), ...


5

Beings higher than human beings are eligible for Jnana and Moksha. Most prominently, the Devas, who dwell in Swarga. Vyasa discusses this in Adhyaya 1 Pada 3 of the Brahma Sutras: Topic-8: Gods Badarayana thinks that beings higher than those (men) (are also qualified for knowledge), for that is possible. If it be objected that this (...


5

It doesn't look like liberation is possible other than Bhuloka. Vishnu Purana, Book 2, Chapter 3 says that world of acts is not the title of any other portions of the universe means only fruits of Karma can be obtained in Bhuloka. THE country that lies north of the ocean, and south of the snowy mountains, is called Bhárata, for there dwelt the descendants ...


5

Moksha is attained when we exhaust our physical karma. But after this world there is astral and causal each having its own karmas see more here http://yieldmore.org/works/autobiography-of-a-yogi/?find=astral%20planet Also, there are those who after attaining moksha and being free of earthly cycle of birth and death, choose to take human birth again in ...


4

One who is in bondage is referred to as baddhAtma. One in bondage who is devout in their search of truth and knowledge for the sake of liberation is said to be a Mumukshu. Reference: Artha Panchakam (Verse 3 and 5, you can read from here) (3). The Baddhas, or the bound, are those souls who are turned away from the Bhagavan (God): (1) by reason of ...


3

No Moksha may NOT be permanent(!), but quite long. Moksha is neither achievable nor given; it just happens for All0. Caution: My opinion on Moksha changed after I wrote answer for Does Shiva or Vishnu or Trikaladarshi Yogi know our Aagami Karma or our free will?. While thought experimenting, this notion blinked as a byproduct. For now, I am convinced but ...


3

Yes moksha is the permanent state. One who has reached the abode of Lord never takes birth again. The recurring cycle of creation and destruction you are mentioning is about those souls who have not achieved moksha. "That supreme abode is called unmanifested and infallible, and it is the supreme destination. When one goes there, he never comes back. That is ...


2

The four classical goals of life (purusharthas) are dharma, artha, kama and moksha. Pravritti is the path of action where one aims for dharma, artha and kama and lives a prosperous and a pleasant life. Nivritti is renunciation of artha and kama as one's goal in life. Gita 16.7 says: The demoniac do not know about the way of action (pravritti) or the way of ...


2

The questions are: Is vicharana(thinking) a mandatory step for attaining Jivan Muktha state? Is there any such example from scriptures that a person got Jivan Muktha state without any vicharana? Vicharana or pondering over an issue with a concentrated mind, is also called dhyAna alongwith Dharana. Dharana (Sanskrit: धारणा) means concentration, ...


2

From Talk 502, Talks with Ramana Maharshi, 16th August 1938 There is room for kama (desire) so long as there is an object apart from the subject (i.e., duality). There can be no desire if there is no object. The state of no-desire is moksha. Because of duality a desire arises for the acquisition of the object. That is the outgoing mind, which is the basis ...


2

From Ramana Maharshi Self-Enquiry M:Whatever thoughts arise as obstacles to one's sadhana (spiritual discipline)—the mind should not be allowed to go in their direction, but should be made to rest in one's self which is the Atman; one should remain as witness to whatever happens, adopting the attitude "Let whatever strange things happen, happen; let us ...


1

This question is more or less duplicate of What will happen if all souls inhabiting Earth attain Moksha? , However as the question deals with interpreting scriptural statements about creation according to Advaita, answering the question: According to Ajatavada (This is Absolute Truth as per Paramarthika level, not Vyavharika level. So, I suggest to read ...


1

Mukti and Moksa mean the same. The meaning is to cast off, abandon, release. It is the process of releasing the soul from the material bondage and hence the common word in english is liberation. Different kinds of liberation are discussed in Srimad Bhagavatam Canto 3, chapter 29, verse 13 A pure devotee does not accept any kind of liberation — salokya, ...


1

There are two classes of devotees: Jivakotis and Isvarakotis. Here, koti means type or like; Jivakotis are ordinary men (like Jiva) and Isvarakotis are Divine men (like Isvara). For Jivakotis, Moksha is a permanent state. For Isvarakotis, Moksha is not a permanent state. Because, He is a person commissioned by God to do good to the world; though liberated ...


1

Asking whether Self realized being does good or evil is like asking whether a stone perceives past or present. Self realized being is no more doer, he is awareness only. He has transcended the doership. From Ashtāvakra Geeta. Surely one who knows That is not touched by virtue or vice, just as space is not touched by smoke, though it seems to be. 4.3 ...


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