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First of all, each Jiva has lived an innumerable number of lives, so even if you lived an unhappy life and got moksha, doesn't mean you've never lived a happy life before. Since each Jiva has lived an infinite amount of lives before, we can presume that it has lived at least one happy human life before: Bhagavad Gita 2.12 - There never was a time when I did ...


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Going by your notion of "winner" and "loser", you seem to be selectively judging the quality of one's life by their last birth before mokSha whereas a jIva has gone through an unknown/infinite number of births. So this is similar to saying that a person who had a perfect fulfilling life living upto an age of 100 years and ultimately going ...


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Indeed even a non Hindu can attain Moksha. Swami Harshananda in one of his introductory essays writes "The statement of Sri Ramakrishna that there are several ice-bergs in the boundless ocean clinches this issue very well. All the ice-bergs as also the ocean itself, are all WATER only! Once this Vedantic background is grasped, the idea of polytheism ...


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According to Adi Shankara, universe as perceived objectively with all its variegated differentiations is unreal as exposited in the following verse (& also in subsequent verses) from the same text, अतः पृथङ्नास्ति जगत्परात्मनः पृथक्प्रतीतिस्तु मृषा गुणादिवत् । आरोपितस्यास्ति किमर्थवत्ताद् धिष्ठानमाभाति तथा भ्रमेण ॥ २३५ ॥ ataḥ pṛthaṅnāsti ...


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