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Going by your notion of "winner" and "loser", you seem to be selectively judging the quality of one's life by their last birth before mokSha whereas a jIva has gone through an unknown/infinite number of births. So this is similar to saying that a person who had a perfect fulfilling life living upto an age of 100 years and ultimately going ...


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First of all, each Jiva has lived an innumerable number of lives, so even if you lived an unhappy life and got moksha, doesn't mean you've never lived a happy life before. Since each Jiva has lived an infinite amount of lives before, we can presume that it has lived at least one happy human life before: Bhagavad Gita 2.12 - There never was a time when I did ...


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According to Adi Shankara, universe as perceived objectively with all its variegated differentiations is unreal as exposited in the following verse (& also in subsequent verses) from the same text, अतः पृथङ्नास्ति जगत्परात्मनः पृथक्प्रतीतिस्तु मृषा गुणादिवत् । आरोपितस्यास्ति किमर्थवत्ताद् धिष्ठानमाभाति तथा भ्रमेण ॥ २३५ ॥ ataḥ pṛthaṅnāsti ...


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Indeed even a non Hindu can attain Moksha. Swami Harshananda in one of his introductory essays writes "The statement of Sri Ramakrishna that there are several ice-bergs in the boundless ocean clinches this issue very well. All the ice-bergs as also the ocean itself, are all WATER only! Once this Vedantic background is grasped, the idea of polytheism ...


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This is answered by Bhishma to Yudhishthira in theShanti Parva of the Mahabharata Yudhishthira said: O sire, what the difference is between the Sankhya and the Yoga system of philosophy. O foremost one of Kuru's race, everything is known to thee, O thou that art conversant with all duties! Bhishma said: The followers of Sankhya praise the Sankhya system and ...


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It depends on how we interpret/translate the term "universe". I believe the "universe" in the verses refer to the whole reality experienced by the self through sense organs, or rather, our own personal experience of the perceivable reality which manifests/appears as different forms in our consciousness. That is, 'universe' in these ...


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In bhagwadgita, it is said that the dharma of a kshatriya where rajputs are said to have descended from is to fight in battle to protect dharma itself (BG 2.31). Dharma here includes all vedic knowledge, cultures, customs & beliefs of the hindu people and the wider umbrella called Sanatana Dharma, it is the duty of a kshatriya just like any varna group ...


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