11

From the book which you have linked in your Question, answer depends upon what Bhagvatam says about the shape of the earth (which seems No). On page 147, the author writes: My second question to Srila Prabhupäda would be this: why does Srila Prabhupäda use the word bhü-gola to describe the Earth as a round planet? For example in this conversation of ...


10

No it doesn't say so. Translation of Śrīmad-Bhāgavatam 4.25.41 is as follows: O my dear hero, who in this world will not accept a husband like you? You are so famous, so magnanimous, so beautiful and so easily gotten. Alternate translation from Motilal Publications: Oh girl, what girl in my position (like me) would not accept a husband a famous, ...


7

First of all, let me explicitly state that I assumed that you are asking about the rules & regulations that a husband and his wife should abide by.Because ,sexual activities, of any other forms are clearly stated ,in Shastras, as Adharmic. Well,except for few prohibited days ,like the days of period,and few others,sexual activities are perfectly legal ...


5

The verse is to be found in the Padma Purana Motilal Vol. 3 through Vol. 10, Uttarakhanda chapter 253, verses 175-179 (precisely it's verse 176 actually), page 3322. However it seems that the Motilal translation is slightly different. EDIT: The verse, slightly different than the question, from Padma Purana in Sanskrit: śrīpadma purāṇam ...


5

No the two are not the same and wikipedia is actually right on this point. According to this excerpt from the Vishnu Purana they are certainly different: When the-three worlds are but one mighty ocean, Brahmá, who is one with Náráyańa, satiate with the demolition of the universe, sleeps upon his serpent-bed--contemplated, the lotus born, by the ascetic ...


4

First, in his translation, Prabhupāda is trying to reach a broad foreign audience not familiar with Vedantic terms. Rather than translate ‘tamah’ as ‘mode of ignorance’ it is better to just use the word tamas or tamah – one of the three gunas - qualities. Oversimplification has its merits – and demerits. His translation is a little confusing as he translates ...


3

The letters and personal conversations are more very contextual and you may just see contrary statements depending on the person and context elsewhere. Books are more authoritative than the personal conversations and letters. Though in some places even in books, he wrote some things as per some modern surveys he heard if that helps it. And that survey result ...


3

It is wrongly translated. Traditional translators are often not scientific and rigorous. Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary, 1899 lists only earth-related senses. Note that it even cites BhP = Bhagavata Purana as one of the texts with this occurrence! bhūgola: m. ‘earth-ball’, the terrestrial globe, earth, Kāv. ; Pañcar. ; BhP.


3

The question is on the premises of below verse. BG 7.11 - ... dharmāviruddho bhūteṣu kāmo ’smi bharatarṣabha ... ... I am sex life which is not contrary to religious principles ... But the translation is wrong. Evidently the most of the translators, interpret following: kAma = desire (source: gitasupersite) It can be desire for anything, such as ...


3

I think Prabhupada is stating diameter of Universe from this verse of Srimad Bhagvatam: एतावाळ् लोक-विन्यासो मान-लक्षण-संस्थाभिर् विचिन्तितः कविभिः स तु । पञ्चाशत्-कोटि-गणितस्य भू-गोलस्य तुरीय-भागो ’यं लोकालोकाचलः ।। (SB 5.20.38) Learned scholars have thus described the planetary systems and their particular symptoms, measurements and locations. By ...


2

Earth or BhuMandal (भूमंडल) seems to be fit in this context rather than entire universe: Similar verses are there in Devi Bhagvatam: Skandha 8: Chapter 21 too: मूर्धन्यर्पितमणुवत्सहस्रमूर्ध्नो भूगोलं सगिरिसरित्समुद्रसत्त्वम् । आनन्त्यादनमितविक्रमस्य भूम्नः को वीर्याण्यधिगणयेत्सहस्रजिह्वः ॥ ५ ॥ एवंप्रभावो भगवाननन्तो दुरन्तवीर्यो...


2

As far as I can tell, Srila Prabhupada and Swami Chinmayananda never had a debate. However Srila Prabhupada once invited Swami Chinmayananda to a debate over whether the latter was an Avatara, but was turned down, as described by Sri Nathji Dasa, who was initially a follower of Swami Chinmayananda and then became a follower of Srila Prabhupada: ...


2

Ancient history is full of ice ages, earthquakes, tsunamis and other calamities, natural and man-made such as wars. During that time it would be difficult to find fruits, vegetables or grow grains. For survival people would have had to eat meat. But this would have been difficult for vegetarians and so they would have offered it to Kali first and said ...


2

The cave of the heart is mentioned in many Upanishads. Realising through self-contemplation that primal God, difficult to be seen, deeply hidden, set in the cave (of the heart), dwelling in the deep, the wise man leaves behind both joy and sorrow. Katha Upanishad I.2.12 The cave of the heart is also known as the heart lotus or hrit padma. Unlike the ...


1

This is one thing I felt Sri Prabhupada was wrong in thinking. Unfortunately neither Christianity nor Islam is compatible/ or very similar in essence with Vaishnavism. In Vaishnavism you are not supposed to eat any flesh, but in Islam and Christianity there is no problem (even with cow) "We have subjected the [animals] unto you, so that you may give ...


1

Sravanam - hearing, is not the same as reading books, whether it is Prabhupada's or others. Sravanam technically refers to hearing Sri Krishna's name (during japa), hear about his glories, his leelas, his qualities and also those that of his devotees. Reading the books should be done with focus. If reading it out loudly is what helps once focus, that's fine....


1

I have also wondered exactly which place is regarded as the region of heart. Because, after we have sipped during Achamana we are required to touch the seven holes of the head as well as the seat of soul (as per Manu Smriti). Now, the seat of the soul is said to be the region of heart in the Upnishads. So, is that region is on the left of our chest where ...


1

I agree with @iammilind that the translation of BG 7.11 you cite in your question is a bit misleading and changes the whole meaning or intent of your question. This by no means undermines Prabhupada's translation or purport. Personally, I liked Shankaracharya's interpretation of the verse from here the most: Commentary by Sri Adi Shankaracharya of ...


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