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The Rig Veda VIII.63 is dedicated to Indra, except the last 12th Mantra. The translation given by Stephanie W. Jamison and Joel P. Brereton is as follows; For us are the Rudras [=Maruts] in their profusion and the mountains of one accord at the Vr̥tra-smashing, where the call is “Carry (the day)!” The steadfast one who has been established for the praiser ...


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In Puranas it was used to indicate the incarnation of Vishnu. Not only in the Puranas but in the Vedas too Varaha is mentioned as an incarnation of Vishnu. From the Mahanarayana Upanishad of the Krishna Yajur Veda: uddhrtAsi varAheNa krishNena shatabAhunA You (mother Earth) were lifted up by Krishna (Vishnu) with his hundred arms in the form of Varaha. ...


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So are there any references in Puranas/itihasa to justify the deification of epithets, which is contrary to Rig Vedic principles? Vishnu Purana Thus the one only god, Janárddana(Supereme God), takes the designation of Brahmá, Vishńu, and Śiva, accordingly as he creates, preserves, or destroys Aranya Parva CCLXX The Supreme Spirit hath three conditions. ...


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There is in Srimad Bhagavadam good explanation of deification of epithets. It is true that Vishnu, Rudra, Agni, Ashwin are all Brahman. However, these are different aspects of Brahman and yield different results when worshipped and hence the different aspects are not of equal value for the spiritual aspirant. All the deities are channels to the Supreme. Sri ...


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They are Agni, Surya and Vayu Here is the Hindi translation to the mentioned verse by Gayatri Pariwar: English translation of it would be as follows: Sadhakas refine their Atman which is Venerable like fire, water and sun, by knowing the supreme light in their antahkarana (inner cause). They excel their Atman with the help of these three forms of Agni. And ...


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Varaha is interpreted as strength of a boar in this verse by the commentator Sayana. Rudra does not become a Varaha but is as strong as a Varaha. Sayana: firm limbs like a Varaha. Rig Veda Samhita 1.114.5, Bengali translation by Nilanjana Sikdardutta, Ramakrishna Mission Institute of Culture


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That is an incorrect translation, not sure where you obtained it. Sanskrit words - 'vRtra' - means restrainer/a container of thunder clouds/overbearing containers/clouds; 'yoni' - generally means a container/bearer (only if using it when describing a particular human's origin is it used a equivalent for a female's womb); 'mAnava' - does not mean Manu, but ...


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Krsanu is most probably an asura of drought. Krsanu: Guardian of Soma, most probably Asura of drought who prevents men from enjoying life giving rain. Rig Veda Samhita Bengali translation by Professor Nilanjana Sikdardutta, Ramakrishna Mission Institute of Culture


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In Rig Veda IV.27.3-4 and also at IX.77.2, the archer Kr̥śānu was mentioned as guardian of Soma. The archer Kr̥śānu,guardian of Soma, shoots at the fleeing falcon with his precious cargo, and manages only to shoot off one feather. ava yac chyeno asvanīd adha dyor vi yad yadi vāta ūhuḥ puraṃdhim | sṛjad yad asmā ava ha kṣipaj jyāṃ kṛśānur astā manasā ...


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Rig Veda mentions purandara - पुरन्दर (one who destroyed cities). Rig Veda praises both Agni and Indra as purandara - पुरन्दर. In praise of Agni: Rig Veda VI.16.14 तमु त्वा दध्यङ्ङृषिः पुत्र ईधे अथर्वणः। वृत्रहणं पुरन्दरम् ॥१४॥ tamu tvā dadhyaṃṃ ṛṣiḥ putra īdhe atharvaṇaḥ | vṛtrahaṇaṃ purandaram || In praise of Indra, Rig Veda II.20.7 स वृ॑त्र॒हेन्द्र॑: ...


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[Disclaimer: I am not here to argue which sect is correct (although you can clearly see Vaishnava bias in many of the sources I present). I am just using my knowledge of scripture to defend all worshipers alike.] First, it is important to understand the different objects these epithets refer to. Let's take the name Indra for example. Indra is both a god (the ...


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