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15

According to Swami Vivekananda the practice was limited and was outlawed in the mid 19th century. He says that although the British took steps to formally outlaw it, it was already being condemned at the time by various Hindu intellectuals of the time and steps were being taken to stop the practice. Sathi was a cultural practice. It is not a religious ...


12

The "Sati Pratha" has been extolled in Hindu Sastras but none mention it as something mandatory. So,it is upto the wives to decide and can't be enforced upon them as a "Sastra Vachan"(a directive from Scriptures). The Parashara Smriti(in Chapter 4),for example says,that : If a woman follows her departed lord, by burning herself on the same ...


11

By seeing an alternate translation of that verse, i.e. Rig Veda 10.18.8, it says the opposite of Sati. Rise, woman, (and go) to the world of living beings: come, this man near whom you sleep is lifeless: you have enjoyed this state of being the wife of your husband, the suitor who took you by the band. Also, there is commentary from Saynacharya ...


5

Before I go forward to my answer I would Like to clarify a specific word 'SATI'. SATI : Pavitra ( meaning Pure ), anything or anyone in its purest form is called Sati, a female who is limited to her husband is considered as Sati, male are not considered for this name as males are born Impure ( sorry this is my personal view after knowing many things, do not ...


5

There is absolutely no truth to it. It has become routine to deny any aspects of the ancient Indian culture which seem embarassing from the current perspective by attributing malevolence or ignorance to the so-called "Western" scholars and translators while all that they have done is a meticulous work just as they did with Egyptian hieroglyphics or Sumerian ...


4

Only a Pativrata alone can enter the pyre upon the death of her husband. That too, if she has young children, or she is pregnant, or she is menstruating, even a Pativrata too cannot undergo Sati. I will provide verses from scriptures which discuss Sati practice: Parasara Smriti 4.32 If a woman follows her departed lord, by burning herself on the ...


4

Is there any evidence of wife widow burning practice? Though Satī was not widely practiced in ancient India, there's enough evidence in Hindu scripture to suggest it wasn't a British propaganda. In Vālmīki Rāmāyaṇa (Uttara-kāṇḍa), we find Vedavatī's mother ascend the funeral pyre of her dead father, Kuśadhvaja. Chapter 7 [Uttara-kāṇḍa] – Sarga 17 ...


3

Swami Chandrasekarendra Saraswati in the book Hindu Dharma: The Universal Way of Life explains satī or sahagamana as follows. Sahagamana When people nowadays talk of "satī" or "sahagamana" they mean it to be a custom in which the widow is forcibly thrown into the funeral pyre of her husband. We do not know for sure whether such an act of ...


2

Where in our texts is satī mentioned? Besides Satī devī, are there others who performed satī? First off, Satī's jumping into the sacrificial fire doesn't count as satī because her husband Śiva was alive at that point. Here's a couple of instances from the Itihāsas, check Wikipedia for more. In Vālmīki Rāmāyaṇa (Uttara-kāṇḍa), we find Vedavatī's ...


1

No it is not a sin. However, discard the desire (kama) and material wealth (artha) if contrary to Dharma; as also, any usage or custom or rules regarded as source of Dharma if at any time they were to lead to unhappiness or arouse people's indignation. Manu Smriti 4.176


1

In simple terms this was practiced because for a chaste wife the fire of separation from husband is much more difficult than giving up the body with the husband and there are also merits associated with it. In Parasara Dharma Sastra, Chapter IV text 29 it says 'If a woman has led a continent life, after her lord departed this life, she wins a region of ...


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