9

In the famous rudra ashtadhyAyi of MAdhyandina samhita. There is this mantra in the fifth chapter. It is taken from the moola samhita.


5

No , the Purusha Sukta of Shukla Yajurveda is not fully dedicated to Aditya. We can say that because Surya or Aditya itself is said to be born from the eyes this Purusha in Yajurveda Samhita 31.12 . The devata of Shukla Yajur Veda Purusha Suktam Mantras from 1-16 is Purusha AdiBeej पुरुष आदिबीज - ( Purusha whom is the primary seed of creation). ...


4

That is what i always intended to say the back answer of yours say women must stay away from rituals and same for shudra but vedic richas are even created by women that's why i always intend to find answers from vedas inspite of smritis and purans the voilence prevails there. when the knowledge is also for a stranger then why not for people of us. Read from ...


3

भद्रैषां लक्ष्मी र्निहिताधि वाचि bhadraiṣāṁ lakṣmī rnihitādhi vāci "an auspicious fortune is attached to their words" — Rig Veda, x.71.2, Translated by John Muir In Atharvaveda , Lakshmi evolves into a complex concept with plural manifestations. Book 7, Chapter 115 of Atharva Veda describes the plurality, asserting that a hundred ...


3

Yes, he did. Among the Madhyadina and Kanva Vajasaneyi Shakhas of Shukla Yajurveda, Sayanacharya has a commentary on the Kanva Samhita. A book comprised of that commentary can be purchased from here. From the foreword/preface to Volume 1: We have contemplated to bring out the edition of Kanva Samhita, with Padapatha and three commentaries in four ...


3

Was the Śukla Yajurveda unknown to Veda-Vyāsa? C. V. Vaidya, who tries to stay as close to tradition as possible, in History of Sanskrit Literature, says that the Śukla Yajurveda was compiled a generation or two after Kṛṣṇa Dvaipāyana Vyāsa had already compiled the 3 Vedas i.e., Ṛgveda, Kṛṣṇa Yajurveda and Sāmaveda. And because Atharvaveda was also compiled ...


3

Both Uvata and Mahidhara (who lived prior to Sayana), who have written commentaries on the Shukla Yajur Veda, explain this verse plainly. In other words, they take the meaning at face value. Uvata: यथेमाम् । यथा इमां वाचं कल्याणीं अनुद्वेजिनीम् । दीयतां भुज्यतामित्येवमादिकाम् । आवदानि जनेभ्योऽर्थाय । के ते जना इत्यत आह । ब्रह्मराजन्याभ्यां ब्राह्मणाय रा...


3

As discussed in my previous post, Rudram is present in the shukla yajurveda which is part of Rudra ashtadhyaayi which is a collection of some mantras of shukla yajurveda vajasaneyi samhita. The fifth chapter of Rudra ashtadhyayi is the rudram (as in Krishna yajurveda) and the eighth chapter of Rudra-ashtadhyaayi is the chamakam (as in KY). The whole of ...


2

No, it's not present in Kṛṣṇa Yajurveda. I've searched in Sanskrit Wikisource which contains Saṃskṛta text of Taittiriya, Maitrāyaṅī and kāthaka saṃhitās of Kṛṣṇa Yajurveda but this verse is not found in it.


2

There are two forms of Yajurveda: Krishna (Black) and the Shukla (White). The Krishna Yajurveda consists of prose mixed with the mantras, therefore the word Krishna. Among different recension of the Krishna Yajurveda, Taittrīya is the most popular one, however, Maitrāyaṇīya recension is also studied well by the scholars. The Taittrīya Samhita has no ...


2

Are both Śukla and Kṛṣṇa Yajurveda saṃhitas derived from the same parent source or are they totally independent from each other? They are totally independent of each other, but like all Vedas, there are some mantras common between both. The Taittiriya Shakkha of the Krishna Yajur Veda was disseminated by Yajnavalkya: Texts 64-65: Yājñavalkya, the son ...


2

MAdhyandina shakha has many unique features and some of them are totally different from other Vedic recitations. It is the second slowest chanting after Samaveda shakha. Hence the chanting is clearly heard and every letter can be heard. Veda chanting in some shakhas involve hasta sanket or hasta sanchalana (movement of hands to indicate swaras). Usually ...


1

One of my friends is a scholar in Vedas. He gave the following explanation. Yajurvedic Rudra is totally different from Shiva. He's the destructive form of Indra Marutvā. When Indra is prayed to send his ūti (help) Rudra is prayed to avoid his heti (missile of affliction). When Maruts turn destructive (instead of their constructive aggression) they ...


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