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For your question 'So why they used to do that?' : Quoting from Dr.Koenraad Elst's 1994 Essay "Caste: The view from Belgium": Untouchability originates in the belief that evil spirits surround dead and dying substances. People who work with corpses, body excretions or animal skins had an aura of danger and impurity, so they were kept away from ...


10

This question has more to do with human nature than Hinduism. When people were divided into castes based upon their work, some castes declared themselves superior and called others inferior. Worshiping Gods was considered superior and noble work, so that caste became superior. Cleaning, washing etc. were considered inferior work, so that caste became ...


8

Here's a dialogue between Bhīṣma and Yudhiṣṭhira from Anuśāsana-parva of Mahābhārata. [Bhīṣma says] I shall in this connection, tell thee what the eternal usage is. In days of yore. O king, the Kshatriyas used to serve the Brahmanas. The Vaisya in a similar manner used in those days to worship the royal order, and the Sudra to worship the Vaisya. ...


4

Adi Shankara is no doubt the most important Acharya in medieval India. He, however, had a dark side. A perusal of his commentary on Pseudo-Sudra in Brahma Sutra lays bare his attitude on Sudras. I am posting an excerpt of his bhasya below. We do not know enough of his daily activity to know whether he personally practiced untouchability. However, his ...


4

First of all, the word "Dalit" is not an ancient Sanskrit word. Like the word "Harijan", "Dalit" is a word used by so-called anti-caste "reformers" to attack certain aspects of the caste system they disagreed with. So Hindu scripture doesn't talk about the word "Dalit", but it does talk about Chandalas. Here is what Bhishma says about Chandalas in this ...


3

There are several issues with the link you have used as the basis of your question, but ignoring those, I will answer the underlying question. Karma decides quality of life The body that a soul takes birth in is primarily determined by its karma, in a way that it can get appropriate reactions and nullify the karma (in minute parts per birth, but that's the ...


3

If Adi Shankara was trying to avoid the Chandala then he was simply following the injunctions of Scriptures. So, if you want to blame someone (or something) here, then blame the Scriptures. Because Adi Shankara was simply adhering to them. See the following verses from Manu Smriti: 3.239. A Chandala, a village pig, a cock, a dog, a menstruating woman, ...


2

Caste hierarchy and discrimination is not sanctioned by the Vedas. I mentioning an excerpt from an article by Swami Venkatraman: First, caste refers to jati, not varna. Jatis are the thousands of indigenous social- occupational groups, while varna refers to the four individualized societal functions described in many texts. Understanding this ...


2

Earliest mention of 4 classes of humans was made in Purusha Sukta from Rig Veda X.90.12. The Brahman was his mouth, of both his arms was the Rājanya made. His thighs became the Vaiśya, from his feet the Śūdra was produced. We have to remember that this division was based on guna and karma , but not based on birth based. This was reiterated by Sri ...


1

Yes, it's likely to be true. Short answer: ChAndAla-s are not allowed within the city limit, let alone the temples. Note: We are talking about god's idol here and Not god. Refer the analogy for better interpretation. Ancient Indian culture was highly relying on vibes and aura, based on which Certain things are auspicious & inauspicious. ChAndAla & ...


1

It has it's origin in practicing cleanliness when contagious diseases were in abundance, which had no cure. So the people having professions related to 'unclean' things like wastes, leather etc were prohibited from touching, accessing public places and common water supplies like lakes and wells. In course of time this became a custom.


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