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-1

I don't have enough reputation to comment but 4.4.6 of the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad seems to describe Nirvāṇa. Since Brihadaranyaka Upanishad is believed to be composed around [700 BCE][1] and Buddhism did not begin at least until [5th to 4th century BCE][1], Nirvāṇa should be considered as a pre-Buddhist term. Also, maybe the exact meaning we attribute to ...


1

Those terms are superfluous and artificial. Upanishads were never separate texts in ancient or medieval times. They were just contiguous chapters in a Veda Samhita, Brahmana or Aranyaka. Even in the commentaries of Sayanacharya (14th century), we don't find references saying "this Upanishad" or "that Upanishad". The reference is to a ...


3

Not only 3 gods, but all gods and goddesses are the same. If you haven't already heard of the famous Rig Vedic verse 1.164.46: इन्द्रं मित्रं वरुणमग्निमाहुरथो दिव्यः स सुपर्णो गरुत्मान् । एकं सद् विप्रा बहुधा वदन्त्यग्निं यमं मातरिश्वानमाहुः ॥ They call Agni as Indra, Mitra, Varuna, and the divine golden-feathered great being. The one reality Agni, the ...


3

None of the so-called "sanyasa Upanishads" are part of the traditional orthodox Vedic canon. Yajnavalkya Upanishad, Sanyasa Upanishad, Naradaparivrajaka Upanishad, etc. are very late medieval productions. That is abundantly evident from their late medieval language style as well as their utter emphasis on renunciation and sanyasa and as the quotes ...


4

Shri Adi Shankaracharya quoted a verse from Atmabodopanishad which is similiar to the one in Narayana upanishad in his bhashya of VS under the name Vishnu. 1.Vishnu Sahasranama - Shankar Bhashya, Hindi translation by Gita Press, Reprinted in 2013 Page no 69(Devanagiri script 69) The verse of Narayana Upanishad (from sanskritdocuments.org) similiar to the ...


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